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Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment

Abstract

Development is achieved through growing and managing the 'portfolio of assets' available to a household or a nation. Soils, water, plants and animals often make up the biggest chunk of poor people's assets. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) has taken stock of these environmental assets worldwide. It reveals that fully sixty percent are being degraded – with poor people disproportionately suffering the consequences such as shortage of clean water, floods and droughts. Yet the MA also identified instances of effective asset management – proven 'Response Options' that deserve scaling up. This briefing note identifies the major developmental implications of the MA, and calls for action in four areas: Information – getting information on environmental assets and hazards to the heart of development planning; Institutional reform – encouraging ecosystem management by poor people and local organisations, and enabling better oversight by national authorities; International cooperation – increasing aid and benchmarking it against just how far off-track we are on MDG7 (the 'environmental sustainability' goal); Investment vehicles and budgets – to support long-term environmental management in key environmentally-sensitive sectors. Action on these is so urgently required that we can no longer avoid asking what it will cost. We propose 'Millennium Ecosystem Budgets',  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2006
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: IIED briefing papers series
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; INVESTMENT; BUDGETS; INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION; ECOSYSTEMS; MANAGEMENT
OSTI ID:
22059786
Research Organizations:
International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), London (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: GB12OA592
Availability:
Commercial reproduction prohibited. Available from ETDE as OSTI ID: 22059786; See the IIED website for other briefings, publications, blogs, etc., at http://www.iied.org
Submitting Site:
ETDE
Size:
6 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Feb 22, 2013

Citation Formats

Bass, Steve. Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. United Kingdom: N. p., 2006. Web.
Bass, Steve. Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. United Kingdom.
Bass, Steve. 2006. "Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_22059786,
title = {Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment}
author = {Bass, Steve}
abstractNote = {Development is achieved through growing and managing the 'portfolio of assets' available to a household or a nation. Soils, water, plants and animals often make up the biggest chunk of poor people's assets. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) has taken stock of these environmental assets worldwide. It reveals that fully sixty percent are being degraded – with poor people disproportionately suffering the consequences such as shortage of clean water, floods and droughts. Yet the MA also identified instances of effective asset management – proven 'Response Options' that deserve scaling up. This briefing note identifies the major developmental implications of the MA, and calls for action in four areas: Information – getting information on environmental assets and hazards to the heart of development planning; Institutional reform – encouraging ecosystem management by poor people and local organisations, and enabling better oversight by national authorities; International cooperation – increasing aid and benchmarking it against just how far off-track we are on MDG7 (the 'environmental sustainability' goal); Investment vehicles and budgets – to support long-term environmental management in key environmentally-sensitive sectors. Action on these is so urgently required that we can no longer avoid asking what it will cost. We propose 'Millennium Ecosystem Budgets', globally and nationally.}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2006}
month = {Jul}
}