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Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

Abstract

As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2012
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-1680
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 92 refs, 61 figs, 13 tabs
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 42 ENGINEERING; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ACCIDENTS; BURNUP; CARBON STEELS; CLADDING; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; CREEP; DRY STORAGE; FUEL ASSEMBLIES; FUEL INTEGRITY; GASKETS; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN; KNOWLEDGE BASE; MEMBER STATES; MONITORING; NEUTRON ABSORBERS; OXIDATION; PACKAGING; POLYMERS; REINFORCED CONCRETE; SHIELDING MATERIALS; SPENT FUEL STORAGE; STAINLESS STEELS; STORAGE FACILITIES; STRESS CORROSION; WET STORAGE
OSTI ID:
22028544
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Contract Number:
Coordinated Research Project SPAR-II
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-130810-8; ISSN 1011-4289; TRN: XA12S0151116814
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/TE_1680_web.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
161 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Jan 18, 2013

Citation Formats

Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II). IAEA: N. p., 2012. Web.
Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II). IAEA.
2012. "Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22028544,
title = {Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)}
abstractNote = {As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing conditions which would impact on the long-term spent fuel integrity. Vacuum drying and hot gas recirculation drying are employed in preparation leading to dry storage. The drying process is of importance to the dry storage systems as it prevents the presence of any water remnants which could potentially facilitate some degradation mechanisms during storage. Temperature increase during drying has to be controlled to minimize the potential for hydride re-orientation. In addition to research on spent fuel assembly integrity, research activities on the behaviours of storage facility components including reinforced concrete, neutron absorbers used in storage racks and baskets, neutron shielding materials, metal gaskets, polymer seal, stainless steel and carbon steel are also being conducted. As a conclusion, it remains important to continue to study and share results regarding fuel and materials behaviour in storage. In particular, changes in fuel and material design, and the increase in discharge burnup require continued research on spent fuel performance in long- term storage and post-storage transportation.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2012}
month = {Jul}
}