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Inertial Fusion Energy

Abstract

In 1917, Albert Einstein suggested the theory of stimulated emission of light that led to the development of the laser. The first laser, based on Einstein's theory, was demonstrated by the Maiman experiment in 1960. In association with the invention and developments of the laser, N.G. Basov, A. Prokorov and C.H. Towns received the Nobel prize for physics in 1963. On the other hand, it had been recognized that nuclear fusion energy is the energy source of our universe. It is the origin of the energy in our sun and in the stars. Right after the laser oscillation experiment, it was suggested by J. Nuckolls, E. Teller and S. Colgate in the USA and A. Sakharov in the USSR that nuclear fusion induced by lasers be used to solve the energy problem. Following the suggestion, the pioneering works for heating plasmas to a thermonuclear temperature with a laser were published by N. Basov, O.N. Krohin, J.M. Dawson, C.R. Kastler, H. Hora, F. Flux and S. Eliezer. The new concept of fusion ignition and burn by laser 'implosion' was proposed by J. Nuckolls, which extended the spherically imploding shock concept discovered by G. Guderley to the laser fusion concept. Since then,  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2012
Product Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 52 figs., 159 refs.; Related Information: In: Fusion Physics| by Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang (eds.)| 1158 p.
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ENERGY SOURCES; ICF DEVICES; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT; INERTIAL FUSION DRIVERS; IODINE LASERS; IPP GARCHING; LANL; LASER IMPLOSIONS; NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY; OSCILLATIONS; PLASMA; PLASMA HEATING; STIMULATED EMISSION; SUN; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; VISIBLE RADIATION
OSTI ID:
22028540
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-130410-0; TRN: XA12R0294116806
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1562_web.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1043-1117
Announcement Date:
Jan 18, 2013

Citation Formats

Mima, K. Inertial Fusion Energy. IAEA: N. p., 2012. Web.
Mima, K. Inertial Fusion Energy. IAEA.
Mima, K. 2012. "Inertial Fusion Energy." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22028540,
title = {Inertial Fusion Energy}
author = {Mima, K}
abstractNote = {In 1917, Albert Einstein suggested the theory of stimulated emission of light that led to the development of the laser. The first laser, based on Einstein's theory, was demonstrated by the Maiman experiment in 1960. In association with the invention and developments of the laser, N.G. Basov, A. Prokorov and C.H. Towns received the Nobel prize for physics in 1963. On the other hand, it had been recognized that nuclear fusion energy is the energy source of our universe. It is the origin of the energy in our sun and in the stars. Right after the laser oscillation experiment, it was suggested by J. Nuckolls, E. Teller and S. Colgate in the USA and A. Sakharov in the USSR that nuclear fusion induced by lasers be used to solve the energy problem. Following the suggestion, the pioneering works for heating plasmas to a thermonuclear temperature with a laser were published by N. Basov, O.N. Krohin, J.M. Dawson, C.R. Kastler, H. Hora, F. Flux and S. Eliezer. The new concept of fusion ignition and burn by laser 'implosion' was proposed by J. Nuckolls, which extended the spherically imploding shock concept discovered by G. Guderley to the laser fusion concept. Since then, laser fusion research has started all over the world. For example, many inertial fusion energy (IFE) facilities have been constructed for investigating implosion physics: Lasers: GEKKO I, GEKKO II, GEKKO IV, GEKKO MII and GEKKO xII at ILE, Osaka University, Japan; JANUS, CYCLOPS, ARUGUS, SHIVA and NOVA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), USA; OMEGA at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), University of Rochester, USA; PHEBUS at Limeil, Paris, France; the ASTERIx iodine laser at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching, Germany; MPI, GLECO at the Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), ecole Polytecnique, France; HELIOS at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Shengan II at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China; VULCAN at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK; PHAROS and NIKE at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, DC, USA; and so on. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2012}
month = {Sep}
}