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Tritium in the Physical and Biological Sciences. V. 1. Proceedings of a Symposium

Conference:

Abstract

The use of tritium for research in physics, chemistry, biology and hydrology has in recent years become increasingly important. It was for this reason that the first international conference to discuss the progress of new developments was organized by the IAEA in conjunction with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity and held from 3-10 May 1961, in Vienna. The first five sessions of the Symposium were devoted to the use of tritium in hydrology, physics and chemistry. Special emphasis was laid on the role of tritium as a tracer in hydrology, especially in the study of water movement. The establishment and improvement of counting and detection techniques to facilitate the application of tritium as a tracer was another aspect discussed in this part of the proceedings. Papers were read on the preparation of tritiated compounds and it was generally agreed that further clarification of the mechanism of various techniques, and of the Wilzbach gas exposure technique in particular, would lead to further developments in the synthesis of a number of tritium compounds important in biology. Other papers were concerned with tritium applications to studies of the mechanism of some chemical reactions together with the effects of tritium isotopes. During the  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 1962
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
STI/PUB-39(vol.1)
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on Tritium in the Physical and Biological Sciences, Vienna (Austria), 3-10 May 1961; Other Information: Refs., figs., tabs.; Related Information: Series: Proceedings Series
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BACTERIA; BIOLOGY; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DETECTION; HYDROLOGY; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; NEOPLASMS; PROCEEDINGS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVITY; TRITIUM; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS
OSTI ID:
22028502
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA12R0254116768
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
380 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Jan 18, 2013

Conference:

Citation Formats

Tritium in the Physical and Biological Sciences. V. 1. Proceedings of a Symposium. IAEA: N. p., 1962. Web.
Tritium in the Physical and Biological Sciences. V. 1. Proceedings of a Symposium. IAEA.
1962. "Tritium in the Physical and Biological Sciences. V. 1. Proceedings of a Symposium." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22028502,
title = {Tritium in the Physical and Biological Sciences. V. 1. Proceedings of a Symposium}
abstractNote = {The use of tritium for research in physics, chemistry, biology and hydrology has in recent years become increasingly important. It was for this reason that the first international conference to discuss the progress of new developments was organized by the IAEA in conjunction with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity and held from 3-10 May 1961, in Vienna. The first five sessions of the Symposium were devoted to the use of tritium in hydrology, physics and chemistry. Special emphasis was laid on the role of tritium as a tracer in hydrology, especially in the study of water movement. The establishment and improvement of counting and detection techniques to facilitate the application of tritium as a tracer was another aspect discussed in this part of the proceedings. Papers were read on the preparation of tritiated compounds and it was generally agreed that further clarification of the mechanism of various techniques, and of the Wilzbach gas exposure technique in particular, would lead to further developments in the synthesis of a number of tritium compounds important in biology. Other papers were concerned with tritium applications to studies of the mechanism of some chemical reactions together with the effects of tritium isotopes. During the second part of the Symposium the biological applications of tritium and tritiated compounds were discussed. These included general problems connected with the biological uses of tritium and the radiation effects of tritium on living organisms such as viruses, bacteria and cancer cells. The value of tritium in biological studies became apparent because of the ease with which a large number of metabolically active compounds such as hormones, vitamins and other important constituents in the body can be labelled with tritium. Tritium is also a weak beta-emitter and autoradiographie s of tissues and single cells containing tritium-labelled compounds allow an excellent localization of the tracer. The Symposium was attended by some 290 scientists from 27 countries and five international organizations who altogether contributed a total of 67 papers. The Agency believes that the publications of the proceedings will not only provide information for a wider public but will also help to stimulate further research in the use of tritium.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1962}
month = {Jan}
}