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China, India, South Africa, Brazil (BASIC): Crucial for the global environment

Abstract

The rising importance of the BASIC countries in a changing world Over the last decade the emerging economies have become increasingly important for the development of the global economy. This trend was reinforced by the global financial crisis which hit the developed economies the hardest, and after which the emerging economies emerged as crucial growth centres in the global economy. We are entering into a new era in global politics, and a broad process is currently taking place of restructuring global institutions and political processes to increasingly take into account the interests of the emerging economies. A global environmental crisis constitutes the backdrop for this change in global politics, as the current volume of production and consumption of the planets renewable resources (including the capacity to absorb greenhouse gas emissions) is beyond the planets regenerative capacity. The breakdown of the Doha Development Round in World Trade, the creation of the BRIC group and the G20, the emergence of the BASIC group of key emerging economies and the following developments under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, all testify to the fact that China, India, South Africa and Brazil (BASIC) today have a decisive and increasing influence in world politics.  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2011
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ECON-2011-011
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; BRAZIL; CHINA; INDIA; SOUTH AFRICA; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; CLIMATIC CHANGE
OSTI ID:
22000188
Research Organizations:
Senter for Oekonomisk Analyse (ECON), Oslo (Norway)
Country of Origin:
Norway
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-82-8232-161-7; TRN: NO1206112
Availability:
Commercial reproduction prohibited. Available from ETDE as OSTI ID: 22000188; Also available in PDF directly at: http://www.econ.no/stream_file.asp?iEntityId=4796
Submitting Site:
NWN
Size:
92 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Dec 06, 2012

Citation Formats

China, India, South Africa, Brazil (BASIC): Crucial for the global environment. Norway: N. p., 2011. Web.
China, India, South Africa, Brazil (BASIC): Crucial for the global environment. Norway.
2011. "China, India, South Africa, Brazil (BASIC): Crucial for the global environment." Norway.
@misc{etde_22000188,
title = {China, India, South Africa, Brazil (BASIC): Crucial for the global environment}
abstractNote = {The rising importance of the BASIC countries in a changing world Over the last decade the emerging economies have become increasingly important for the development of the global economy. This trend was reinforced by the global financial crisis which hit the developed economies the hardest, and after which the emerging economies emerged as crucial growth centres in the global economy. We are entering into a new era in global politics, and a broad process is currently taking place of restructuring global institutions and political processes to increasingly take into account the interests of the emerging economies. A global environmental crisis constitutes the backdrop for this change in global politics, as the current volume of production and consumption of the planets renewable resources (including the capacity to absorb greenhouse gas emissions) is beyond the planets regenerative capacity. The breakdown of the Doha Development Round in World Trade, the creation of the BRIC group and the G20, the emergence of the BASIC group of key emerging economies and the following developments under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, all testify to the fact that China, India, South Africa and Brazil (BASIC) today have a decisive and increasing influence in world politics. With regards to the environment, this means that BASIC countries increasingly will set environmental standards in global markets as their economies to a greater extent come to represent global buying power, increasingly will influence to what extent environmental concerns are mainstreamed into international agreements (such as WTO) in general, and also will decide the scope and level of ambition and scope of international environmental agreements (as we see in UNFCCC). Among the emerging economies China, India, South Africa, and Brazil stand out as particularly important. China and India alone represent more than 35 per cent of the global population and are the most rapidly growing economies in the world. At the same time both countries face severe environmental constraints and energy security issues, spurring innovation while threatening to undermine future development and sustained poverty alleviation. Brazil is a global treasure house for tropical forests which constitute a key carbon stock and vital refuge of biodiversity, a leader of the developing world in forums such as the G-77, and the economic engine of South America. South Africa is the leading nation in sub-Saharan Africa, where we find most of the worlds Least Developed Countries. South Africa is thus a crucial partner when addressing poverty reduction and sustainable development through sound economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ecological overshoot: Not only a developed country problem The average ecological footprint of middle income countries including Brazil, China and South Africa has already surpassed the global average available biocapacity (ref. table below). This shows that although Brazil, China and South Africa are still developing countries with significant portions of their populations living in poverty, they have already passed the threshold of what may be considered sustainable development (based on a global average). While Indias footprint per capita does not exceed the global average it is almost twice the available biocapacity in India itself, showing that also India has a resource security and sustainable development challenge.(auth)}
place = {Norway}
year = {2011}
month = {Jul}
}