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Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens

Abstract

This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified.  More>>
Authors:
Chuaqui, C A; Petkau, A; Greenstock, C L; Brown, C P [1] 
  1. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1995
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INFO-0594
Reference Number:
SCA: 560101; 560151; PA: AIX-27:031339; EDB-96:074918; NTS-96:017797; SN: 96001578151
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Sep 1995
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CARCINOGENS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; ALKYLATING AGENTS; AMINES; AROMATICS; AZO DYES; CANADA; CANADIAN AECB; CARCINOGENESIS; DETECTION; EPIDEMIOLOGY; HEALTH HAZARDS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; METALS; MONITORING; NEOPLASMS; NITROSO COMPOUNDS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; REGULATIONS; SYNERGISM; WORKING CONDITIONS
OSTI ID:
217508
Research Organizations:
Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE96620555; CNN: Project 85.8.15; TRN: CA9600016031339
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE96620555
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
90 p.
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Chuaqui, C A, Petkau, A, Greenstock, C L, and Brown, C P. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens. Canada: N. p., 1995. Web.
Chuaqui, C A, Petkau, A, Greenstock, C L, & Brown, C P. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens. Canada.
Chuaqui, C A, Petkau, A, Greenstock, C L, and Brown, C P. 1995. "Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens." Canada.
@misc{etde_217508,
title = {Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens}
author = {Chuaqui, C A, Petkau, A, Greenstock, C L, and Brown, C P}
abstractNote = {This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified. The list includes arsenic, asbestos, benzene, cadmium, beryllium, nickel, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead and trichloroethylene. Several recommendations are made in relation to the need for practical and efficient monitoring methods for chemical carcinogens, the definition of radiation and chemical dose equivalencies, and the classification of human chemical carcinogens, as well as their disposal. (author). 122 refs., 8 tabs., 6 figs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1995}
month = {Sep}
}