You need JavaScript to view this

Report of the Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control

Abstract

Despite the availability of a range of modern pest control techniques, insects remain a major cause of production losses in agriculture and contribute significantly to diseases of man and livestock. The increasing incidence of pesticide resistance, and concerns over the environmental impact of residues, have highlighted the need for improved technologies. As a result, genetic methods of pest control, including the use of irradiation sterilized insects, have become of increasing importance. It is therefore essential that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division continues to promote the development and application of this method of pest control. The advisory group concluded that the opportunities for genetic control might be widened by the application of new techniques, particularly recombinant DNA technology. The scope for integration of genetic control methods with other control measures, and ist use as a temporary suppressive measure on an area-wide basis was also recognized. Examples are given from representative groups of insect pests to illustrate how these concepts can be applied. The advisory group regarded the Seibersdorf laboratory as a unique facility for the conduct of tactical research related to mass-rearing and release procedures for major pests such as medfly and tsetse spp. Associated research on genetic sexing of medfly, diet  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1987
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-12N0683; IAEA-D4-AG-562
Resource Relation:
Conference: Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control, Vienna (Austria), 9-13 Nov 1987
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; A CENTERS; AVAILABILITY; CERATITIS CAPITATA; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DISEASES; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FAO; GENES; GENETIC CONTROL; GENETICS; IAEA; INHIBITION; IRRADIATION; MAN; MASS REARING; MEETINGS; PESTICIDES; RECOMBINANT DNA; STERILITY; ANIMAL BREEDING; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; BIOLOGY; COLOR CENTERS; CONTROL; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DIPTERA; DNA; FLIES; FRUIT FLIES; INSECTS; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; INVERTEBRATES; MAMMALS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PEST CONTROL; POINT DEFECTS; PRIMATES; REARING; VACANCIES; VERTEBRATES
OSTI ID:
21555039
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA12N0683033096
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/nafa/ipc/public/ipc-Genetic-Methods-for-insect-Control-1987.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
25 pages
Announcement Date:
May 31, 2012

Citation Formats

Report of the Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control. IAEA: N. p., 1987. Web.
Report of the Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control. IAEA.
1987. "Report of the Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21555039,
title = {Report of the Advisory Group Meeting on Genetic Methods of Insect Control}
abstractNote = {Despite the availability of a range of modern pest control techniques, insects remain a major cause of production losses in agriculture and contribute significantly to diseases of man and livestock. The increasing incidence of pesticide resistance, and concerns over the environmental impact of residues, have highlighted the need for improved technologies. As a result, genetic methods of pest control, including the use of irradiation sterilized insects, have become of increasing importance. It is therefore essential that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division continues to promote the development and application of this method of pest control. The advisory group concluded that the opportunities for genetic control might be widened by the application of new techniques, particularly recombinant DNA technology. The scope for integration of genetic control methods with other control measures, and ist use as a temporary suppressive measure on an area-wide basis was also recognized. Examples are given from representative groups of insect pests to illustrate how these concepts can be applied. The advisory group regarded the Seibersdorf laboratory as a unique facility for the conduct of tactical research related to mass-rearing and release procedures for major pests such as medfly and tsetse spp. Associated research on genetic sexing of medfly, diet recycling and the development of more environmentally acceptable alternatives for pre-release suppression of medfly were considered to be important research projects. The advisory group concluded that the laboratory should continue to remain a centre of excellence for mass-rearing technologies for medfly and tsetse spp., and for training scientists and technicians from developing countries. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division currently plays a major co-ordinating and supportive role for those areas of international research which impinge on genetic control. The advisory group believes that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division should maintain its initiative in bringing together leading genetics and molecular biology laboratories and continue to support their research on general gene transfer techniques and the development of genetic sexing methods for insects that are amenable to genetic control. The action of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division in co-ordinating the use of F-1 sterility for the control of lepidopteran pests was also regarded as an important initiative. The advisory group strongly supports the continuance of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division's activities in co-ordinating research programmes, promoting information flow through the newsletter and in providing training fellowships.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1987}
month = {Jul}
}