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Genetic technologies to enhance the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)

Abstract

The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) has been used very successfully against range of pest insects, including various tephritid fruit flies, several moths and a small number of livestock pests. However, modern genetics could potentially provide several improvements that would increase the cost-effectiveness of SIT, and extend the range of suitable species. These include improved identification of released individuals by incorporation of a stable, heritable, genetic marker; built-in sex separation (genetic sexing); reduction of the hazard posed by non-irradiated accidental releases from mass-rearing facility (fail-safe); elimination of the need for sterilization by irradiation (genetic sterilization). We discuss applications of these methods and the state of the art, at the time of this meeting, in developing suitable strains. We have demonstrated, in several key pest species, that the required strains can be constructed by introducing a repressible dominant lethal genetic system, a method known as RIDL(trade mark). Based on field experience with Medfly, incorporation of a genetic sexing system into SIT programs for other tephritids could potentially provide a very significant improvement in cost-effectiveness. We have now been able to make efficient female-lethal strains for Medfly. One advantage of our approach is that it should be possible rapidly to extend this technology  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2006
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-BR-10501
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7. International symposium on fruit flies of economic importance: from basic to applied knowledge, Salvador, BA (Brazil), 10-15 Sep 2006
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANASTREPHA; GENETIC ENGINEERING; IONIZING RADIATIONS; MASS REARING; PEST CONTROL; STERILE INSECT RELEASE; STERILE MALE TECHNIQUE; ANIMAL BREEDING; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; BIOTECHNOLOGY; CONTROL; DIPTERA; FLIES; FRUIT FLIES; INSECTS; INVERTEBRATES; RADIATIONS; REARING
OSTI ID:
21518553
Research Organizations:
Biofabrica Moscamed Brasil, Juazeiro, BA (Brazil)
Country of Origin:
Brazil
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: BR11V3274109336
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
BRN
Size:
8 pages
Announcement Date:
Dec 29, 2011

Citation Formats

Alphey, Luke, Baker, Pam, Condon, George C, Condon, Kirsty C, Dafa'alla, Tarig H, Fu, Guoliang, Jin, Li, Labbe, Genevieve, Morrison, Neil M, Nimmo, Derric D, O'Connell, Sinead, Phillips, Caroline E, Plackett, Andrew, Scaife, Sarah, Woods, Alexander, Burton, Rosemary S, Epton, Matthew J, and Gong, Peng. Genetic technologies to enhance the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Brazil: N. p., 2006. Web.
Alphey, Luke, Baker, Pam, Condon, George C, Condon, Kirsty C, Dafa'alla, Tarig H, Fu, Guoliang, Jin, Li, Labbe, Genevieve, Morrison, Neil M, Nimmo, Derric D, O'Connell, Sinead, Phillips, Caroline E, Plackett, Andrew, Scaife, Sarah, Woods, Alexander, Burton, Rosemary S, Epton, Matthew J, & Gong, Peng. Genetic technologies to enhance the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Brazil.
Alphey, Luke, Baker, Pam, Condon, George C, Condon, Kirsty C, Dafa'alla, Tarig H, Fu, Guoliang, Jin, Li, Labbe, Genevieve, Morrison, Neil M, Nimmo, Derric D, O'Connell, Sinead, Phillips, Caroline E, Plackett, Andrew, Scaife, Sarah, Woods, Alexander, Burton, Rosemary S, Epton, Matthew J, and Gong, Peng. 2006. "Genetic technologies to enhance the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)." Brazil.
@misc{etde_21518553,
title = {Genetic technologies to enhance the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)}
author = {Alphey, Luke, Baker, Pam, Condon, George C, Condon, Kirsty C, Dafa'alla, Tarig H, Fu, Guoliang, Jin, Li, Labbe, Genevieve, Morrison, Neil M, Nimmo, Derric D, O'Connell, Sinead, Phillips, Caroline E, Plackett, Andrew, Scaife, Sarah, Woods, Alexander, Burton, Rosemary S, Epton, Matthew J, and Gong, Peng}
abstractNote = {The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) has been used very successfully against range of pest insects, including various tephritid fruit flies, several moths and a small number of livestock pests. However, modern genetics could potentially provide several improvements that would increase the cost-effectiveness of SIT, and extend the range of suitable species. These include improved identification of released individuals by incorporation of a stable, heritable, genetic marker; built-in sex separation (genetic sexing); reduction of the hazard posed by non-irradiated accidental releases from mass-rearing facility (fail-safe); elimination of the need for sterilization by irradiation (genetic sterilization). We discuss applications of these methods and the state of the art, at the time of this meeting, in developing suitable strains. We have demonstrated, in several key pest species, that the required strains can be constructed by introducing a repressible dominant lethal genetic system, a method known as RIDL(trade mark). Based on field experience with Medfly, incorporation of a genetic sexing system into SIT programs for other tephritids could potentially provide a very significant improvement in cost-effectiveness. We have now been able to make efficient female-lethal strains for Medfly. One advantage of our approach is that it should be possible rapidly to extend this technology to other fruit fly species; indeed we have recently been able also to make genetic sexing strains of Medfly (Anastrepha ludens). (author)}
place = {Brazil}
year = {2006}
month = {Jul}
}