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Assessment of the second conference

Journal Article:

Abstract

Full text: (Sigvard A. Eklund, Conference Secretary General of the Second Conference, 1958). The Geneva Conference of 1958 was up to then the world's biggest and most comprehensive conference concerned with science and technology. Its description - the peaceful uses of atomic energy - was somewhat deceptive, since the conference covered not only engineering applications and energy problems but the nuclear sciences as a whole. It promoted specialized information, but at the same time attempted to counteract the tendency for overspecialization by attracting scientists and technicians from all the various disciplines which have contributed to the development of atomic energy. Such a big international meeting held under the auspices of the United Nations was effective in a manner different to that of smaller meetings in that it stimulated Governments to release and review material which otherwise might have remained undigested or buried in sometimes inaccessible reports and documents. The timing of the conference was propitious. The advanced countries had successfully operated research reactors long enough to enable the less advanced nations to be provided with much needed information; radioisotopes had become available on a relatively large scale and at lower prices. Consequently research, which had previously been restricted to a  More>>
Authors:
Eklund, S A [1] 
  1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Publication Date:
Aug 15, 1964
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: 1 photo
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; MEETINGS; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; POWER GENERATION; POWER REACTORS; RESEARCH REACTORS; THERMONUCLEAR DEVICES; UNITED NATIONS; ENERGY; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; REACTORS; RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS
OSTI ID:
21512101
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA10K0738130880
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull063/06305180506.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 5-6
Announcement Date:
Dec 12, 2011

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Eklund, S A. Assessment of the second conference. IAEA: N. p., 1964. Web.
Eklund, S A. Assessment of the second conference. IAEA.
Eklund, S A. 1964. "Assessment of the second conference." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21512101,
title = {Assessment of the second conference}
author = {Eklund, S A}
abstractNote = {Full text: (Sigvard A. Eklund, Conference Secretary General of the Second Conference, 1958). The Geneva Conference of 1958 was up to then the world's biggest and most comprehensive conference concerned with science and technology. Its description - the peaceful uses of atomic energy - was somewhat deceptive, since the conference covered not only engineering applications and energy problems but the nuclear sciences as a whole. It promoted specialized information, but at the same time attempted to counteract the tendency for overspecialization by attracting scientists and technicians from all the various disciplines which have contributed to the development of atomic energy. Such a big international meeting held under the auspices of the United Nations was effective in a manner different to that of smaller meetings in that it stimulated Governments to release and review material which otherwise might have remained undigested or buried in sometimes inaccessible reports and documents. The timing of the conference was propitious. The advanced countries had successfully operated research reactors long enough to enable the less advanced nations to be provided with much needed information; radioisotopes had become available on a relatively large scale and at lower prices. Consequently research, which had previously been restricted to a small number of privileged institutions, could be carried out anywhere; industry could freely benefit from the same tools; and - perhaps most important from the human aspect - methods could be introduced in medicine which offered new possibilities. In theoretical physics a whole series of newly discovered particles with intriguing properties stimulated the imagination of physicists. After an experimental and testing period the first power reactors were going into operation. Data and experience on fuel and on constructional problems had become available which justified a technical evaluation of the situation. Following the 1955 conference atomic energy activity commenced and gained momentum in a number of countries. Nevertheless progress in the application of nuclear energy for power production had advanced slower than anticipated, therefore making a reassessment highly desirable in the interest of both advanced and developing countries. There were great expectations concerning nuclear fusion, which just before the conference had attracted the attention of the scientific world. The possibility in principle of power production from nuclear reactions similar to those which furnish the energy of the stars had been recognized, but the extent to which scientific and technical problems had to be solved before this theoretical possibility could be realized was unknown. Nearly 2200 papers presented at the conference not only provided a survey of past achievements but also pointed the way to future developments. The record of the conference, consisting of 33 volumes, published very quickly, represents the most comprehensive reference text in nuclear science and technology and will certainly be of continuing value for many years to come. he governmental and industrial exhibitions were probably as far-reaching in scope as the conference itself. These were lively exhibitions which attracted the layman as much as the specialist, and included experimental demonstrations of important effects. The exhibits which included operating reactors, full-size models of space probes, and a collection of fusion devices - models and full-size equipment - exceeded all expectations by their novelty, diversity and open display. For a multitude of scientists, who for financial and other reasons could not have afforded visits to the major national laboratories, especially the fusion section gave first-hand information of great value for their own work. (author)}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {3}
volume = {6}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1964}
month = {Aug}
}