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Health in uranium mining

Journal Article:

Abstract

Safety in mining radioactive ores, and in milling and treating them, has been a serious preoccupation for some thirty years. Much earlier than this, however, a high incidence of lung cancer had been reported among the miners of the Erzgebirge mountains in the German-Czechoslovak border region (places familiar under the names of Schneeberg and St. Joachims thai). Investigations into deaths from radium poisoning began at these mines in 1937, and the results seemed to indicate a causal connection between the radioactive substances and the development of lung cancer and other diseases. These matters were discussed in Vienna at the symposium on Radiological Health and Safety in Nuclear Materials Mining and Milling, 26-31 August 1963. The symposium was organized by IAEA and co-sponsored by ILO and WHO; some 70 papers were presented. The purpose of the meeting was to collect and compare the very widely scattered research results and practical experience in this field. One conclusion which emerged was that the milling of uranium ore involves no unusual problem. Provided standard controls - as applied to the treatment of other minerals - are strictly enforced, exposure to radiation can be kept to a minimum. In the actual mining of uranium, the  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 1964
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: 3 photos
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CARCINOGENESIS; MINERS; MINING; NEOPLASMS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; RADIATION DOSES; URANIUM DEPOSITS; URANIUM MINERALS; URANIUM MINES; WORKING CONDITIONS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; DISEASES; DOSES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MATERIALS; MINERAL RESOURCES; MINERALS; MINES; PATHOGENESIS; PERSONNEL; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE MINERALS; RESOURCES; SAFETY; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES
OSTI ID:
21512085
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA10K0722130864
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull061/06105802629.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 26-29
Announcement Date:
Dec 12, 2011

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

None. Health in uranium mining. IAEA: N. p., 1964. Web.
None. Health in uranium mining. IAEA.
None. 1964. "Health in uranium mining." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21512085,
title = {Health in uranium mining}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {Safety in mining radioactive ores, and in milling and treating them, has been a serious preoccupation for some thirty years. Much earlier than this, however, a high incidence of lung cancer had been reported among the miners of the Erzgebirge mountains in the German-Czechoslovak border region (places familiar under the names of Schneeberg and St. Joachims thai). Investigations into deaths from radium poisoning began at these mines in 1937, and the results seemed to indicate a causal connection between the radioactive substances and the development of lung cancer and other diseases. These matters were discussed in Vienna at the symposium on Radiological Health and Safety in Nuclear Materials Mining and Milling, 26-31 August 1963. The symposium was organized by IAEA and co-sponsored by ILO and WHO; some 70 papers were presented. The purpose of the meeting was to collect and compare the very widely scattered research results and practical experience in this field. One conclusion which emerged was that the milling of uranium ore involves no unusual problem. Provided standard controls - as applied to the treatment of other minerals - are strictly enforced, exposure to radiation can be kept to a minimum. In the actual mining of uranium, the problems are only beginning to be clearly defined, but it seems to be well established that exposure of miners to excessive levels of radon will have most serious consequences. In a complicated pattern there are many factors at work, ranging from the physical behaviour of sundry radioactive substances to the personal histories of individual miners. The need for considerably more research was stressed throughout the discussions.}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {1}
volume = {6}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1964}
month = {Jan}
}