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Suppressing Resistance to Bt Cotton with Sterile Insect Releases

Technical Report:

Abstract

Genetically engineered crops that produce insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are grown widely for pest control. However, insect adaptation can reduce the toxins' efficacy. The predominant strategy for delaying pest resistance to Bt crops requires refuges of non-Bt host plants to provide susceptible insects to mate with resistant insects. Variable farmer compliance is one of the limitations of this approach. Here we report the benefits of an alternative strategy where sterile insects are released to mate with resistant insects and refuges are scarce or absent. Computer simulations show that this approach works in principle against pests with recessive or dominant inheritance of resistance. During a largescale, four-year field deployment of this strategy in Arizona, resistance of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) to Bt cotton did not increase. A multitactic eradication program that included the release of sterile moths reduced pink bollworm abundance by >99%, while eliminating insecticide sprays against this key invasive pest. (author)
Authors:
Tabashnik, B E; [1]  Sisterson, M S; [2]  Ellsworth, P C [3] 
  1. Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  2. USDA-ARS, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, Parlier, CA (United States)
  3. Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ (United States)
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 2011
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-11R0485INIS-XA-11R0485
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Abstract only; The full paper was published online in: Nature Biotechnology (7 November 2010) doi:10.1038/nbt.1704; Related Information: In: Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 76, January 2011, 48 p. pages.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BACILLUS; BOLLWORM; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COTTON; PEST CONTROL; STERILE INSECT RELEASE; TOXINS; ANIMALS; ANTIGENS; ARTHROPODS; BACTERIA; CONTROL; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; INSECTS; INVERTEBRATES; LEPIDOPTERA; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; MOTHS; SIMULATION; TOXIC MATERIALS
OSTI ID:
21467663
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria); FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1011-274X; TRN: XA11R0486056647
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Newsletters/IPC-NL-76.pdf; Web sites: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/nafa/ipc/index.html; http://www.fao.org/ag/portal/age-index.html
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 39
Announcement Date:
Aug 13, 2011

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Tabashnik, B E, Sisterson, M S, and Ellsworth, P C. Suppressing Resistance to Bt Cotton with Sterile Insect Releases. IAEA: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1038/NBT.1704.
Tabashnik, B E, Sisterson, M S, & Ellsworth, P C. Suppressing Resistance to Bt Cotton with Sterile Insect Releases. IAEA. doi:10.1038/NBT.1704.
Tabashnik, B E, Sisterson, M S, and Ellsworth, P C. 2011. "Suppressing Resistance to Bt Cotton with Sterile Insect Releases." IAEA. doi:10.1038/NBT.1704. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1038/NBT.1704.
@misc{etde_21467663,
title = {Suppressing Resistance to Bt Cotton with Sterile Insect Releases}
author = {Tabashnik, B E, Sisterson, M S, and Ellsworth, P C}
abstractNote = {Genetically engineered crops that produce insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are grown widely for pest control. However, insect adaptation can reduce the toxins' efficacy. The predominant strategy for delaying pest resistance to Bt crops requires refuges of non-Bt host plants to provide susceptible insects to mate with resistant insects. Variable farmer compliance is one of the limitations of this approach. Here we report the benefits of an alternative strategy where sterile insects are released to mate with resistant insects and refuges are scarce or absent. Computer simulations show that this approach works in principle against pests with recessive or dominant inheritance of resistance. During a largescale, four-year field deployment of this strategy in Arizona, resistance of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) to Bt cotton did not increase. A multitactic eradication program that included the release of sterile moths reduced pink bollworm abundance by >99%, while eliminating insecticide sprays against this key invasive pest. (author)}
doi = {10.1038/NBT.1704}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2011}
month = {Jan}
}