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Energy crops in rotation. A review

Abstract

The area under energy crops has increased tenfold over the last 10 years, and there is large consensus that the demand for energy crops will further increase rapidly to cover several millions of hectares in the near future. Information about rotational systems and effects of energy crops should be therefore given top priority. Literature is poor and fragmentary on this topic, especially about rotations in which all crops are exclusively dedicated to energy end uses. Well-planned crop rotations, as compared to continuous monoculture systems, can be expected to reduce the dependence on external inputs through promoting nutrient cycling efficiency, effective use of natural resources, especially water, maintenance of the long-term productivity of the land, control of diseases and pests, and consequently increasing crop yields and sustainability of production systems. The result of all these advantages is widely known as crop sequencing effect, which is due to the additional and positive consequences on soil physical-chemical and biological properties arising from specific crops grown in the same field year after year. In this context, the present review discusses the potential of several rotations with energy crops and their possibilities of being included alongside traditional agriculture systems across different agro-climatic zones within the  More>>
Authors:
Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter; Monti, Andrea [1] 
  1. Department of Agroenvironmental Science and Technology, University of Bologna, Viale G. Fanin, 44 - 40127, Bologna (Italy)
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 2011
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biomass and Bioenergy; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BRASSICA; ROTATION; SORGHUM; BIOMASS; CROPS; REVIEWS; SUNFLOWERS; EUROPEAN UNION; BIOFUELS; CONTROL; DISEASES; WATER; POWER PLANTS; AGRICULTURE; DEMAND; EFFICIENCY; EUROPE; MAINTENANCE; NUTRIENTS; PRODUCTIVITY; RESOURCES; SOILS; YIELDS; Annual crops; Biomass; Biofuels; Europe; Monoculture; Renewable energy
OSTI ID:
21411560
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0961-9534; BMSBEO; TRN: GB11V0108
Availability:
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2010.08.001
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
page(s) 12-25
Announcement Date:
Apr 14, 2011

Citation Formats

Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter, and Monti, Andrea. Energy crops in rotation. A review. United Kingdom: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2010.08.001.
Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter, & Monti, Andrea. Energy crops in rotation. A review. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2010.08.001.
Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter, and Monti, Andrea. 2011. "Energy crops in rotation. A review." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2010.08.001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2010.08.001.
@misc{etde_21411560,
title = {Energy crops in rotation. A review}
author = {Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter, and Monti, Andrea}
abstractNote = {The area under energy crops has increased tenfold over the last 10 years, and there is large consensus that the demand for energy crops will further increase rapidly to cover several millions of hectares in the near future. Information about rotational systems and effects of energy crops should be therefore given top priority. Literature is poor and fragmentary on this topic, especially about rotations in which all crops are exclusively dedicated to energy end uses. Well-planned crop rotations, as compared to continuous monoculture systems, can be expected to reduce the dependence on external inputs through promoting nutrient cycling efficiency, effective use of natural resources, especially water, maintenance of the long-term productivity of the land, control of diseases and pests, and consequently increasing crop yields and sustainability of production systems. The result of all these advantages is widely known as crop sequencing effect, which is due to the additional and positive consequences on soil physical-chemical and biological properties arising from specific crops grown in the same field year after year. In this context, the present review discusses the potential of several rotations with energy crops and their possibilities of being included alongside traditional agriculture systems across different agro-climatic zones within the European Union. Possible rotations dedicated exclusively to the production of biomass for bioenergy are also discussed, as rotations including only energy crops could become common around bio-refineries or power plants. Such rotations, however, show some limitations related to the control of diseases and to the narrow range of available species with high production potential that could be included in a rotation of such characteristics. The information on best-known energy crops such as rapeseed (Brassica napus) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) suggests that conventional crops can benefit from the introduction of energy crops in the rotation; furthermore, a considerable number of lesser-known energy crops such as biomass sorghum (Sorghum spp.), hemp (Cannabis sativa), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus), Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata) could be expected to lead to even greater benefits according to literature. Therefore, this review aimed at systematizing and reorganizing the existing and fragmentary information on these crops while stressing major knowledge gaps to be urgently investigated. (author)}
doi = {10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2010.08.001}
journal = {Biomass and Bioenergy}
issue = {1}
volume = {35}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2011}
month = {Jan}
}