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IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore

Journal Article:

Abstract

Full text: Governments and organizations interested in developing uranium resources will be assisted by a new service, now being inaugurated by the Agency's laboratories, for the distribution of reference samples of uranium ores. This is an addition to the service which began at Seibersdorf in January 1962 for the distribution of calibrated radionuclides, and which has met with a steadily increasing demand. * Uranium deposits consisting of ores with a uranium content in the range 0.5 - 0.05 per cent occur in a number of countries, including developing countries and can present considerable analytical difficulties. In 1962 the Agency asked Member States whether they would be interested in receiving reference samples of uranium ores to assist them in checking their methods of chemical analysis. The response encouraged the Agency to proceed. There is a multiplicity of types of uranium ores and, initially, three of the most commonly occurring have been selected - torbernite, uraninite and carnotite. Member States have provided the laboratory with supplies of these three types of ore. In order to determine the uranium content, samples are sent to leading laboratories throughout the world, so as to arrive at the most accurate values possible. This work has proved  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1966
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 2
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; CALCIUM 45; CALCIUM 47; CARBON 14; CARNOTITE; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; COBALT 58; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DOSEMETERS; EUROPIUM 152; IAEA; IMPURITIES; IRIDIUM 192; MEMBER STATES; MINING; NUCLEAR ENERGY; POWDERS; RADIUM 228; SAFETY; SILVER; TORBERNITE; TRACE AMOUNTS; URANIUM; URANIUM DEPOSITS; URANIUM ORES; URANIUM OXIDES; URANIUM REQUIREMENTS; ACTINIDE COMPOUNDS; ACTINIDES; ALKALINE EARTH ISOTOPES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CALCIUM ISOTOPES; CARBON ISOTOPES; CHALCOGENIDES; COBALT ISOTOPES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DEMAND; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; ELEMENTS; ENERGY; EUROPIUM ISOTOPES; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; HEAVY NUCLEI; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; INTERNAL CONVERSION RADIOISOTOPES; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; IRIDIUM ISOTOPES; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MATERIALS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; METALS; MINERAL RESOURCES; MINERALS; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHOSPHATE MINERALS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE MINERALS; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIUM ISOTOPES; RARE EARTH NUCLEI; RESOURCES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; URANIUM COMPOUNDS; URANIUM MINERALS; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES
OSTI ID:
21344973
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA08N0793075875
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull082/08204602526.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 25-26
Announcement Date:
Oct 26, 2010

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore. IAEA: N. p., 1966. Web.
IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore. IAEA.
1966. "IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21344973,
title = {IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore}
abstractNote = {Full text: Governments and organizations interested in developing uranium resources will be assisted by a new service, now being inaugurated by the Agency's laboratories, for the distribution of reference samples of uranium ores. This is an addition to the service which began at Seibersdorf in January 1962 for the distribution of calibrated radionuclides, and which has met with a steadily increasing demand. * Uranium deposits consisting of ores with a uranium content in the range 0.5 - 0.05 per cent occur in a number of countries, including developing countries and can present considerable analytical difficulties. In 1962 the Agency asked Member States whether they would be interested in receiving reference samples of uranium ores to assist them in checking their methods of chemical analysis. The response encouraged the Agency to proceed. There is a multiplicity of types of uranium ores and, initially, three of the most commonly occurring have been selected - torbernite, uraninite and carnotite. Member States have provided the laboratory with supplies of these three types of ore. In order to determine the uranium content, samples are sent to leading laboratories throughout the world, so as to arrive at the most accurate values possible. This work has proved to be useful to the laboratories themselves ; in searching for reasons for discrepancies between the different collaborating laboratories, they enlarge their own knowledge and improve their methods. The reference samples are sent out in the form of fine powder, and are available to atomic energy commissions, research laboratories or mining companies. The requesting laboratory, having worked out the analytical process best suited to its needs, is then able to check its results by analysing an IAEA reference sample of known uranium content. By the end of 1966, reference samples will be available of the three ores mentioned, and later also of pure uranium oxide and of uranium oxide containing trace impurities, the last being useful for checking methods of analysing trace elements in uranium. Meanwhile, requests are increasing for the other samples being supplied from the Seibersdorf laboratories. During 1965, twenty different calibrated radionuclides were provided, more than 1500 samples being sent out. Other radionuclides being added to the range are carbon-14, calcium-45, calcium-47, cobalt-58, silver-llOm, europium-152, iridium-192 and radium-228. Some solid calibrated gamma-emitting sources will be provided for calibrating dosimeters; these will have activities in the millicurie range. In addition, solid beta-emitting sources will be developed. Another service, designed to help health and safety monitoring, is the provision of environmental and biological materials which have been 'spiked' with known amounts of radionuclides. These and other services which the laboratories are providing for Member States are being developed by gradual stages. The programme is essentially flexible, and is intended to be adapted to the demonstrated requirements of Member States for work which of its nature is best carried out on an international basis. (author)}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {2}
volume = {8}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1966}
month = {Jun}
}