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Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology

Abstract

Background: The major impediment to the expansion of oncology services is a shortage of personnel. Purpose: To develop a distance learning course for radiation oncology trainees. Materials: Under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Regional Cooperative Agreement administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a CD ROM-based Applied Sciences of Oncology (ASOC) distance learning course of 71 modules was created. The course covers communications, critical appraisal, functional anatomy, molecular biology, pathology. The materials include interactive text and illustrations that require students to answer questions before they can progress. The course aims to supplement existing oncology curricula and does not provide a qualification. It aims to assist students in acquiring their own profession's qualification. The course was piloted in seven countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America during 2004. After feedback from the pilot course, a further nine modules were added to cover imaging physics (three modules), informed consent, burnout and coping with death and dying, Economic analysis and cancer care, Nutrition, cachexia and fatigue, radiation-induced second cancers and mathematical tools and background for radiation oncology. The course was widely distributed and can be downloaded from (http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Training/Aso/register.html). ASOC has been downloaded over 1100 times in the first year after it  More>>
Authors:
Barton, Michael B., E-mail: Michael.Barton@swsahs.nsw.gov.a; [1]  Thode, Richard J [1] 
  1. CCORE and the South Western Clinical School, Liverpool Hospital, University of NSW (Australia)
Publication Date:
Apr 15, 2010
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiotherapy and Oncology; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011; PII: S0167-8140(10)00104-0; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMMUNICATIONS; DEATH; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; IAEA; LEARNING; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; NEOPLASMS; PATHOLOGY; RADIOLOGICAL PERSONNEL; TRAINING; DISEASES; ECONOMICS; EDUCATION; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; PERSONNEL
OSTI ID:
21343557
Country of Origin:
Ireland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0167-8140; RAONDT; TRN: IE10R0154074435
Availability:
Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 129-132
Announcement Date:
Oct 26, 2010

Citation Formats

Barton, Michael B., E-mail: Michael.Barton@swsahs.nsw.gov.a, and Thode, Richard J. Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology. Ireland: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011.
Barton, Michael B., E-mail: Michael.Barton@swsahs.nsw.gov.a, & Thode, Richard J. Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology. Ireland. doi:10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011.
Barton, Michael B., E-mail: Michael.Barton@swsahs.nsw.gov.a, and Thode, Richard J. 2010. "Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology." Ireland. doi:10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011.
@misc{etde_21343557,
title = {Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology}
author = {Barton, Michael B., E-mail: Michael.Barton@swsahs.nsw.gov.a, and Thode, Richard J}
abstractNote = {Background: The major impediment to the expansion of oncology services is a shortage of personnel. Purpose: To develop a distance learning course for radiation oncology trainees. Materials: Under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Regional Cooperative Agreement administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a CD ROM-based Applied Sciences of Oncology (ASOC) distance learning course of 71 modules was created. The course covers communications, critical appraisal, functional anatomy, molecular biology, pathology. The materials include interactive text and illustrations that require students to answer questions before they can progress. The course aims to supplement existing oncology curricula and does not provide a qualification. It aims to assist students in acquiring their own profession's qualification. The course was piloted in seven countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America during 2004. After feedback from the pilot course, a further nine modules were added to cover imaging physics (three modules), informed consent, burnout and coping with death and dying, Economic analysis and cancer care, Nutrition, cachexia and fatigue, radiation-induced second cancers and mathematical tools and background for radiation oncology. The course was widely distributed and can be downloaded from (http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Training/Aso/register.html). ASOC has been downloaded over 1100 times in the first year after it was posted. There is a huge demand for educational materials but the interactive approach is labour-intensive and expensive to compile. The course must be maintained to remain relevant.}
doi = {10.1016/j.radonc.2010.02.011}
journal = {Radiotherapy and Oncology}
issue = {1}
volume = {95}
place = {Ireland}
year = {2010}
month = {Apr}
}