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Public safety around dams : Ontario Power Generation's approach

Journal Article:

Abstract

Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has developed a Waterways Public Safety Program that includes elements such as integrating public safety considerations into normal business practices and decisions; applying conservative decision making principles regarding operations where there are issues of public safety; and seeking partnership opportunities that enhance public safety awareness. The key steps to the public safety risk assessment process include identifying each type of known public interaction at a facility; identifying the hazards associated with those interactions; assigning a rating of likelihood and consequence for each separate public interaction at a facility; and assigning a risk rating, with a risk matrix for each public interaction. OPG now requires that a new public safety risk assessment be completed every 3 years. The risk assessment is a guide to implementing control measures to lower the risk of injury at dam facilities. OPG has adopted the model that every water conveyance structure will have an established hazardous area, typically adjacent to the structure. These areas are delineated with red danger signs and other control measures installed as needed. Yellow signs are used to delineate warning areas where there is a reasonable likelihood of minor injury or where the public may become stranded. As  More>>
Authors:
Bennett, T; Rowat, L [1] 
  1. Ontario Power Generation Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
Apr 01, 2009
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Canadian Dam Association Bulletin; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 2
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS; DAMS; SAFETY; RISK ASSESSMENT; PUBLIC RELATIONS; HAZARDS; SAFEGUARDS; ALARM SYSTEMS; PHYSICAL PROTECTION DEVICES
OSTI ID:
21176964
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1702-014X; TRN: CA0904575
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
page(s) 27-33
Announcement Date:
Jun 08, 2009

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Bennett, T, and Rowat, L. Public safety around dams : Ontario Power Generation's approach. Canada: N. p., 2009. Web.
Bennett, T, & Rowat, L. Public safety around dams : Ontario Power Generation's approach. Canada.
Bennett, T, and Rowat, L. 2009. "Public safety around dams : Ontario Power Generation's approach." Canada.
@misc{etde_21176964,
title = {Public safety around dams : Ontario Power Generation's approach}
author = {Bennett, T, and Rowat, L}
abstractNote = {Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has developed a Waterways Public Safety Program that includes elements such as integrating public safety considerations into normal business practices and decisions; applying conservative decision making principles regarding operations where there are issues of public safety; and seeking partnership opportunities that enhance public safety awareness. The key steps to the public safety risk assessment process include identifying each type of known public interaction at a facility; identifying the hazards associated with those interactions; assigning a rating of likelihood and consequence for each separate public interaction at a facility; and assigning a risk rating, with a risk matrix for each public interaction. OPG now requires that a new public safety risk assessment be completed every 3 years. The risk assessment is a guide to implementing control measures to lower the risk of injury at dam facilities. OPG has adopted the model that every water conveyance structure will have an established hazardous area, typically adjacent to the structure. These areas are delineated with red danger signs and other control measures installed as needed. Yellow signs are used to delineate warning areas where there is a reasonable likelihood of minor injury or where the public may become stranded. As a minimum, OPG uses signage, sluicegate audible alarms, a stepped approach to sluicegate openings and public education. Safety booms and buoys as well as fencing and barricades may be used as additional control measures along with security patrols and video surveillance to target specific public interactions. 6 figs.}
journal = {Canadian Dam Association Bulletin}
issue = {2}
volume = {20}
place = {Canada}
year = {2009}
month = {Apr}
}