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Microbiological and radiobiological studies on the hygienic quality of minimally processed food

Abstract

In the past, there have been three traditional forms of food trading; fresh, canned and frozen foods. In recent years, a fourth form called {sup m}inimally processed food has been developed to respond to an emerging consumer demand for convenient, high-quality and preservative-free products with appearance of fresh characteristics, while being less severely processed (Saracino et al., 1991). Minimally processed food can be used as ready-to-eat, ready-to-use, or ready-to-cook products. They are stored and marketed under refrigeration conditions (Dignan, 1994). Minimally processed food products were developed in 1980's and now they are produced in many advanced and some developing countries. In Egypt, great amounts of minimally processed vegetables are now produced and commercially sold in certain supermarkets. They include fresh-cut lettuce, packaged mixed vegetables salad, shredded carrots, sliced carrots, shredded cabbage (white and red), fresh-cut green beans, mixed peas with diced carrots, mafa spanish, okra, watermelon, pumpkin, garlic, artichoke, celery, parsley, etc. However, there is an increasing interest to offer some other minimally processed vegetables and some types of fresh-cut fruits that can be used as ready-to-eat or ready-to-use. Preparation steps of minimally processed fruit and vegetable products which may include peeling, slicing, shredding, etc save labor and time for  More>>
Authors:
Abu El-Nour, S. A. M. [1] 
  1. National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2007
Product Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Report Number:
INIS-EG-210
Resource Relation:
Other Information: TH: Thesis(Ph.D.); 43 tab., 49 fig., 327 Ref
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ATMOSPHERES; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; ENZYMES; FOOD; FREEZING; FRUITS; GARLIC; HEALTH HAZARDS; IRRADIATION; MICROORGANISMS; PATHOGENS; PRESERVATION; RADIATION PROTECTION; TEMPERATURE RANGE; VEGETABLES
OSTI ID:
21146708
Research Organizations:
Faculty of Science at Damietta Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)
Country of Origin:
Egypt
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: EG0900034026053
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
285 pages
Announcement Date:
Apr 09, 2009

Citation Formats

Abu El-Nour, S. A. M. Microbiological and radiobiological studies on the hygienic quality of minimally processed food. Egypt: N. p., 2007. Web.
Abu El-Nour, S. A. M. Microbiological and radiobiological studies on the hygienic quality of minimally processed food. Egypt.
Abu El-Nour, S. A. M. 2007. "Microbiological and radiobiological studies on the hygienic quality of minimally processed food." Egypt.
@misc{etde_21146708,
title = {Microbiological and radiobiological studies on the hygienic quality of minimally processed food}
author = {Abu El-Nour, S. A. M.}
abstractNote = {In the past, there have been three traditional forms of food trading; fresh, canned and frozen foods. In recent years, a fourth form called {sup m}inimally processed food has been developed to respond to an emerging consumer demand for convenient, high-quality and preservative-free products with appearance of fresh characteristics, while being less severely processed (Saracino et al., 1991). Minimally processed food can be used as ready-to-eat, ready-to-use, or ready-to-cook products. They are stored and marketed under refrigeration conditions (Dignan, 1994). Minimally processed food products were developed in 1980's and now they are produced in many advanced and some developing countries. In Egypt, great amounts of minimally processed vegetables are now produced and commercially sold in certain supermarkets. They include fresh-cut lettuce, packaged mixed vegetables salad, shredded carrots, sliced carrots, shredded cabbage (white and red), fresh-cut green beans, mixed peas with diced carrots, mafa spanish, okra, watermelon, pumpkin, garlic, artichoke, celery, parsley, etc. However, there is an increasing interest to offer some other minimally processed vegetables and some types of fresh-cut fruits that can be used as ready-to-eat or ready-to-use. Preparation steps of minimally processed fruit and vegetable products which may include peeling, slicing, shredding, etc save labor and time for the purchasers, meanwhile removal of waste material during processing reduce transport costs. In addition, the production of such products will make year-round availability of almost all vegetables and fruits possible in fresh form around the world (Baldwin et al., 1995). However, preparation steps of such products increase the native enzymatic activity and the possibility of microbial contamination. Therefore, these products have short shelf-life and this is considered one of the foremost challenging problems in the commercialization of minimally processed foods particularly fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.}
place = {Egypt}
year = {2007}
month = {Jul}
}