You need JavaScript to view this

District heating and energy efficiency in detached houses of differing size and construction

Abstract

House envelope measures and conversion of heating systems can reduce primary energy use and CO{sub 2} emission in the existing Swedish building stock. We analysed how the size and construction of electrically heated detached houses affect the potential for such measures and the potential for cogenerated district heating. Our starting point was two typical houses built in the 1970s. We altered the floor plans to obtain 6 houses, with heated floor space ranging between 100 and 306 m{sup 2}. One of the houses was also analysed for three energy standards with differing heat loss rates. CO{sub 2} emission, primary energy use and heating cost were estimated after implementing house envelope measures, conversions to other heating systems and changes in the generation of district heat and electricity. The study accounted for primary energy, including energy chains from natural resources to useful heat in the houses. We showed that conversion to district heating based on biomass, together with house envelope measures, reduced the primary energy use by 88% and the CO{sub 2} emission by 96%, while reducing the annual societal cost by 7%. The choice of end-use heating system was decisive for the primary energy use, with district heating being the most  More>>
Authors:
Joelsson, Anna; Gustavsson, Leif [1] 
  1. Ecotechnology, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-831 25 Oestersund (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Feb 15, 2009
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Energy; Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: IGEC III Special Issue of the Third International Green Energy Conference (IGEC-III), Vasteras (Sweden), 18-20 Jun 2007; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; HOUSES; CARBON DIOXIDE; DISTRICT HEATING; HEATING SYSTEMS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; HEAT; HEAT LOSSES; BIOMASS; CONSTRUCTION; CONVERSION; COST; EMISSION; COGENERATION; FLOORS; POTENTIALS; REDUCTION; STANDARDS; AVAILABILITY; CHAINS; ELECTRICITY; RESOURCES; SPACE; Heating system; District heating; Cogeneration; Energy supply; Cost; Primary energy; Residential
OSTI ID:
21125271
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619; APENDX; TRN: GB08V4582
Availability:
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2008.03.012
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
page(s) 126-134
Announcement Date:
Feb 05, 2009

Citation Formats

Joelsson, Anna, and Gustavsson, Leif. District heating and energy efficiency in detached houses of differing size and construction. United Kingdom: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/J.APENERGY.2008.03.012.
Joelsson, Anna, & Gustavsson, Leif. District heating and energy efficiency in detached houses of differing size and construction. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.APENERGY.2008.03.012.
Joelsson, Anna, and Gustavsson, Leif. 2009. "District heating and energy efficiency in detached houses of differing size and construction." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.APENERGY.2008.03.012. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/J.APENERGY.2008.03.012.
@misc{etde_21125271,
title = {District heating and energy efficiency in detached houses of differing size and construction}
author = {Joelsson, Anna, and Gustavsson, Leif}
abstractNote = {House envelope measures and conversion of heating systems can reduce primary energy use and CO{sub 2} emission in the existing Swedish building stock. We analysed how the size and construction of electrically heated detached houses affect the potential for such measures and the potential for cogenerated district heating. Our starting point was two typical houses built in the 1970s. We altered the floor plans to obtain 6 houses, with heated floor space ranging between 100 and 306 m{sup 2}. One of the houses was also analysed for three energy standards with differing heat loss rates. CO{sub 2} emission, primary energy use and heating cost were estimated after implementing house envelope measures, conversions to other heating systems and changes in the generation of district heat and electricity. The study accounted for primary energy, including energy chains from natural resources to useful heat in the houses. We showed that conversion to district heating based on biomass, together with house envelope measures, reduced the primary energy use by 88% and the CO{sub 2} emission by 96%, while reducing the annual societal cost by 7%. The choice of end-use heating system was decisive for the primary energy use, with district heating being the most efficient. Neither house size nor energy standard did significantly change the ranking of the heating systems, either from a primary energy or an economic viewpoint, but did affect the extent of the annual cost reduction after implementing the measures. (author)}
doi = {10.1016/J.APENERGY.2008.03.012}
journal = {Applied Energy}
issue = {2}
volume = {86}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2009}
month = {Feb}
}