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Climate protection and carbon in wood. Comparison of management strategies; Klimaschutz und Kohlenstoff in Holz. Vergleich verschiedener Strategien

Abstract

Forests are important for climate protection: They sequester and store carbon, and provide timber for wood products and fossil fuel substitution. These functions interact in a complex way. From a climate protection point of view it is desirable to optimize these interactions, i.e. to maximize the amount of carbon stored in the whole system (called ''forest-timber-option'') and to analyse what impact a management decision at the local level has with regard to the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Inventory methods to estimate the total amount of carbon in a forest are needed. Classical forest inventories assess above-ground tree volume. To estimate total carbon in accordance with the requirements of the Kyoto-Protocol, these inventories need to be expanded with regard to the assessment of disturbances, dead wood decomposition, soil carbon, and the estimation of carbon from volume. Methods invented here can also be used to assess local-level management activities, or to ''factor out'' non-human-induced changes in carbon pools. The optimization of the ''forest-timber-option'' is restricted due to regulations of the Kyoto-Protocol, because forest-related measures are accounted for under other sectors than wood and timber use. Harvested timber is estimated as an ''emission'' from the forest, and forest owners have no  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Nov 05, 2008
Product Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Report Number:
ETDE-DE-1861
Resource Relation:
Other Information: TH: Diss. (Dr.rer.nat.)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION; CLIMATIC CHANGE; MANAGEMENT; MONITORING; STORAGE; WOOD
OSTI ID:
21085509
Research Organizations:
Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultaet
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
German
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: DE08GA852
Availability:
Commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE21085509
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
162 pages
Announcement Date:
Nov 06, 2008

Citation Formats

Rock, J. Climate protection and carbon in wood. Comparison of management strategies; Klimaschutz und Kohlenstoff in Holz. Vergleich verschiedener Strategien. Germany: N. p., 2008. Web.
Rock, J. Climate protection and carbon in wood. Comparison of management strategies; Klimaschutz und Kohlenstoff in Holz. Vergleich verschiedener Strategien. Germany.
Rock, J. 2008. "Climate protection and carbon in wood. Comparison of management strategies; Klimaschutz und Kohlenstoff in Holz. Vergleich verschiedener Strategien." Germany.
@misc{etde_21085509,
title = {Climate protection and carbon in wood. Comparison of management strategies; Klimaschutz und Kohlenstoff in Holz. Vergleich verschiedener Strategien}
author = {Rock, J}
abstractNote = {Forests are important for climate protection: They sequester and store carbon, and provide timber for wood products and fossil fuel substitution. These functions interact in a complex way. From a climate protection point of view it is desirable to optimize these interactions, i.e. to maximize the amount of carbon stored in the whole system (called ''forest-timber-option'') and to analyse what impact a management decision at the local level has with regard to the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Inventory methods to estimate the total amount of carbon in a forest are needed. Classical forest inventories assess above-ground tree volume. To estimate total carbon in accordance with the requirements of the Kyoto-Protocol, these inventories need to be expanded with regard to the assessment of disturbances, dead wood decomposition, soil carbon, and the estimation of carbon from volume. Methods invented here can also be used to assess local-level management activities, or to ''factor out'' non-human-induced changes in carbon pools. The optimization of the ''forest-timber-option'' is restricted due to regulations of the Kyoto-Protocol, because forest-related measures are accounted for under other sectors than wood and timber use. Harvested timber is estimated as an ''emission'' from the forest, and forest owners have no benefit from the use of wood for industrial purposes. Here, an inclusion of forestry in emission trading schemes can be advantageous. Alternative ways to produce wood are short-rotation coppice plantations on agricultural soils. Information about growth and yield potentials are scarce for the regions where land availability is high. Aspen (P. tremula, P. tremuloides) was parameterized in an eco-physiological forest growth model (''4C'') to assess these potentials on sites in Eastern Germany under current and under changing climatic conditions. The results indicate that growth potentials are more sensitive to soil quality than to climatic conditions. Potential yields allow for incomes comparable to standard agriculture, but biodiversity and groundwater recharge may be negatively affected by large-scale plantations. An optimization of the ''forest-timber-option'' requests the use of timber from forests. Harvested timber substitutes additional 70 % of carbon from fossil fuels. Forests under total protection do store more carbon than managed forest, but not equivalent to the substitution effects. Total protection of forests is thus no viable means for climate protection under Central European conditions. (orig.)}
place = {Germany}
year = {2008}
month = {Nov}
}