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Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one)

Abstract

Membrane reforming reactors (MRR) could play a key role in converting natural gas into hydrogen. The major advantage of MRR architecture is the possibility to shift the chemical equilibrium toward the right-hand side of the reaction, improving hydrogen production and allowing, the same time high methane conversion at relatively low temperatures such as 650 C. Such a low operating temperature makes it possible to locate the MRR downstream of a gas turbine, achieving an efficient hybrid system (power+hydrogen) with a significant reduction in energy consumption (around 10%). This paper discusses the whole innovative architecture where conventional tubular reforming is integrated with hydrogen permeable palladium membrane separators. The fundamental concepts are analyzed and integrated into a process scheme; the structural effects of variables design such as reactor temperature outlet, S/C ratio and recycle ratio throughout pinch and sensitivity analysis are described, and a comparison of the process economics with conventional hydrogen technology is presented at the end of the second part of this paper. The production of highly reliable, defect-free and reproducible, Pd-alloy membranes for selective hydrogen separation is a key issue in the proposed hybrid architecture. (author)
Authors:
Barba, D; Giacobbe, F; De Cesaris, A; [1]  Farace, A; Iaquaniello, G; Pipino, A [2] 
  1. Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of L'Aquila (Italy)
  2. TECHNIP-KTI S.p.a., Rome (Italy)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2008
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 14; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; NATURAL GAS; CATALYTIC REFORMING; MEMBRANES; GAS TURBINES
OSTI ID:
21081744
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3199; IJHEDX; TRN: GB08V3279
Availability:
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2008.04.038
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
page(s) 3700-3709
Announcement Date:
Oct 03, 2008

Citation Formats

Barba, D, Giacobbe, F, De Cesaris, A, Farace, A, Iaquaniello, G, and Pipino, A. Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one). United Kingdom: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJHYDENE.2008.04.038.
Barba, D, Giacobbe, F, De Cesaris, A, Farace, A, Iaquaniello, G, & Pipino, A. Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one). United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.IJHYDENE.2008.04.038.
Barba, D, Giacobbe, F, De Cesaris, A, Farace, A, Iaquaniello, G, and Pipino, A. 2008. "Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one)." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.IJHYDENE.2008.04.038. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/J.IJHYDENE.2008.04.038.
@misc{etde_21081744,
title = {Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one)}
author = {Barba, D, Giacobbe, F, De Cesaris, A, Farace, A, Iaquaniello, G, and Pipino, A}
abstractNote = {Membrane reforming reactors (MRR) could play a key role in converting natural gas into hydrogen. The major advantage of MRR architecture is the possibility to shift the chemical equilibrium toward the right-hand side of the reaction, improving hydrogen production and allowing, the same time high methane conversion at relatively low temperatures such as 650 C. Such a low operating temperature makes it possible to locate the MRR downstream of a gas turbine, achieving an efficient hybrid system (power+hydrogen) with a significant reduction in energy consumption (around 10%). This paper discusses the whole innovative architecture where conventional tubular reforming is integrated with hydrogen permeable palladium membrane separators. The fundamental concepts are analyzed and integrated into a process scheme; the structural effects of variables design such as reactor temperature outlet, S/C ratio and recycle ratio throughout pinch and sensitivity analysis are described, and a comparison of the process economics with conventional hydrogen technology is presented at the end of the second part of this paper. The production of highly reliable, defect-free and reproducible, Pd-alloy membranes for selective hydrogen separation is a key issue in the proposed hybrid architecture. (author)}
doi = {10.1016/J.IJHYDENE.2008.04.038}
journal = {International Journal of Hydrogen Energy}
issue = {14}
volume = {33}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2008}
month = {Jul}
}