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A summary of the Berkeley and Livermore pinch programs

Abstract

In order to progress toward practical thermonuclear devices, the principal objective must be to prolong containment times by improving the electrical conductivity of the plasma. Those pinch configurations which are grossly unstable are, of course, unsuitable for practical thermonuclear work. Therefore our purely dynamic experiments are conducted only to study basic shock heating and instability mechanisms. Our basic evaluation of progress in pinch-type experiments is the reduction of the dissipation rate of the magnetic fields. The present pessimistic viewpoint is that most of the pinch devices that depend upon high current density within the plasma are beset with an enhanced dissipation rate which is disastrous to pinch containment. This dissipation is derived either from an electron plasma current instability or from hydromagnetic turbulence. Both have been predicted in theory and observed in experiment. Studies have been presented for the following cases: linear and toroidal pinch experiments; sheet pinch devices of modest size; homopolar geometry; shock heating and screw dynamic pinch.
Authors:
Colgate, Stirling A [1] 
  1. University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1958
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XU-022; P-1064-USA
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. United Nations international conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy, Geneva (Switzerland), 1-13 Sep 1958; Other Information: This summary covers the work of O.A. Anderson, W.R. Baker, A. Bratenahl, W.B. Kunkel and R.V. Pyle at the Berkeley Laboratory and of J.P. Ferguson, H.P. Furth and R.E. Wright at the Livermore Laboratory; 11 figs; Related Information: In: Proceedings of the second United Nations international conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. V. 32. Controlled fusion devices, 474 pages.
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CONFIGURATION; CURRENT DENSITY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRONS; EVALUATION; GEOMETRY; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PINCH DEVICES; PLASMA; PLASMA INSTABILITY; SHOCK HEATING
OSTI ID:
21070256
Research Organizations:
United Nations, Geneva (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
UN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XU0800069084586
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 123-128
Announcement Date:
Sep 30, 2008

Citation Formats

Colgate, Stirling A. A summary of the Berkeley and Livermore pinch programs. UN: N. p., 1958. Web.
Colgate, Stirling A. A summary of the Berkeley and Livermore pinch programs. UN.
Colgate, Stirling A. 1958. "A summary of the Berkeley and Livermore pinch programs." UN.
@misc{etde_21070256,
title = {A summary of the Berkeley and Livermore pinch programs}
author = {Colgate, Stirling A}
abstractNote = {In order to progress toward practical thermonuclear devices, the principal objective must be to prolong containment times by improving the electrical conductivity of the plasma. Those pinch configurations which are grossly unstable are, of course, unsuitable for practical thermonuclear work. Therefore our purely dynamic experiments are conducted only to study basic shock heating and instability mechanisms. Our basic evaluation of progress in pinch-type experiments is the reduction of the dissipation rate of the magnetic fields. The present pessimistic viewpoint is that most of the pinch devices that depend upon high current density within the plasma are beset with an enhanced dissipation rate which is disastrous to pinch containment. This dissipation is derived either from an electron plasma current instability or from hydromagnetic turbulence. Both have been predicted in theory and observed in experiment. Studies have been presented for the following cases: linear and toroidal pinch experiments; sheet pinch devices of modest size; homopolar geometry; shock heating and screw dynamic pinch.}
place = {UN}
year = {1958}
month = {Jul}
}