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Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

Journal Article:

Abstract

According to its Statute the IAEA has to fulfil a dual function - to help individual countries in solving their specific problems and to undertake tasks in the common interest of all its Member States. With this latter aim in mind the Agency has placed a number of research contracts with national research institutes. The purpose and scope of two of them is described below by the scientists responsible for their execution. The Agency has contributed to this work by putting at the institutes' disposal scientists from its own staff apparatus and financial aid.IAEA placed a research contract concerning the effects of small radiation doses on cells, in particular on nervous cells, with the Pharmacological Institute of the University of Vienna. This Institute appeared well suited to deal with the problem owing to the type of its previous research work. The Director, Prof. Franz Bruecke, and his collaborator Dr. Otto Kraupp, have long been interested in the functioning of the nervous system and in the influence of different drugs upon it. It was particularly fortunate that the electrical properties and functions of cells had been measured by a method specially developed at this Institute. From the above mentioned observations one  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 1959
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 0; Journal Issue: 0; Other Information: 6 photos, 2 graphs
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CONTRACTS; IAEA; IRRADIATION; MAMMALS; MEMBER STATES; MUSCLES; RADIATION DOSES
OSTI ID:
21055445
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA08N0503072445
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull000/00005300710.pdf;INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 7-10
Announcement Date:
Aug 06, 2008

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Hug, O. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses. IAEA: N. p., 1959. Web.
Hug, O. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses. IAEA.
Hug, O. 1959. "Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21055445,
title = {Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses}
author = {Hug, O}
abstractNote = {According to its Statute the IAEA has to fulfil a dual function - to help individual countries in solving their specific problems and to undertake tasks in the common interest of all its Member States. With this latter aim in mind the Agency has placed a number of research contracts with national research institutes. The purpose and scope of two of them is described below by the scientists responsible for their execution. The Agency has contributed to this work by putting at the institutes' disposal scientists from its own staff apparatus and financial aid.IAEA placed a research contract concerning the effects of small radiation doses on cells, in particular on nervous cells, with the Pharmacological Institute of the University of Vienna. This Institute appeared well suited to deal with the problem owing to the type of its previous research work. The Director, Prof. Franz Bruecke, and his collaborator Dr. Otto Kraupp, have long been interested in the functioning of the nervous system and in the influence of different drugs upon it. It was particularly fortunate that the electrical properties and functions of cells had been measured by a method specially developed at this Institute. From the above mentioned observations one could expect that instantaneous reactions of cells to radiation would also lead to changes of the electrical status. Consequently, this method is now being applied to the research undertaken for IAEA. Different cells of plants and animals, ranging from algae to muscle fibres of mammals, were chosen as objects. So far changes of potentials-had been observed only during irradiation with very high doses. During these investigations another useful test for small radiation doses was developed, namely the measurement of the through-flow of an artificial blood solution through the blood vessels of an intestinal loop. It was observed that a few seconds after irradiation the flow rate diminishes, and returns to its normal level only when irradiation ends. This phenomenon could also be registered with a Kymograph. It is believed that also the instantaneous radiation reactions of the mammalian intestine are reflex-like stimulus responses and that the same rules are valid as those governing the reactions to mechanical, chemical, optical and electrical stimuli.}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {0}
volume = {0}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1959}
month = {Jan}
}