You need JavaScript to view this

Improvement of animal production through research using radioisotopes and radiation

Journal Article:

Abstract

High birth rates coupled with greater longevity continue to increase the.world's population, especially in the less developed countries. The prevention of undernutrition and ultimately starvation will only be averted by increased food production and more efficient use of that food. At the same time people who have largely subsisted upon plant food diets and whose standards of living are rising, want to increase the use of animal products in order to upgrade their diets. To provide this high quality food animal scientists must find ways of increasing the supply especially in the less developed countries. Since most of the available pasture lands are presently being fully utilized or overgrazed, improved efficiency of the present herds and use of agroindustrial wastes are the only methods left to increase production significantly. The use of radioisotopes and radiation in research are making major contributions to the understanding of the processes necessary to achieve better animal production. In order to provide a forum for exchange of information in this field, the FAO/IAEA Joint Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture organized an international symposium, held in Vienna, from 2?6 February, on the use of nuclear techniques in animal production. Among the topics discussed  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1976
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: International symposium on nuclear techniques in animal production and health as related to the soil-plant system, Vienna (Austria), 2-6 Feb 1976; Other Information: 1 photo
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL BREEDING; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; FERTILITY; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; RADIOIMMUNOASSAY; RADIOISOTOPES; REPRODUCTION; VETERINARY MEDICINE
OSTI ID:
21033127
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA08N0400053334
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull182/18205503335.pdf;INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 33-35
Announcement Date:
Jun 20, 2008

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Improvement of animal production through research using radioisotopes and radiation. IAEA: N. p., 1976. Web.
Improvement of animal production through research using radioisotopes and radiation. IAEA.
1976. "Improvement of animal production through research using radioisotopes and radiation." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21033127,
title = {Improvement of animal production through research using radioisotopes and radiation}
abstractNote = {High birth rates coupled with greater longevity continue to increase the.world's population, especially in the less developed countries. The prevention of undernutrition and ultimately starvation will only be averted by increased food production and more efficient use of that food. At the same time people who have largely subsisted upon plant food diets and whose standards of living are rising, want to increase the use of animal products in order to upgrade their diets. To provide this high quality food animal scientists must find ways of increasing the supply especially in the less developed countries. Since most of the available pasture lands are presently being fully utilized or overgrazed, improved efficiency of the present herds and use of agroindustrial wastes are the only methods left to increase production significantly. The use of radioisotopes and radiation in research are making major contributions to the understanding of the processes necessary to achieve better animal production. In order to provide a forum for exchange of information in this field, the FAO/IAEA Joint Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture organized an international symposium, held in Vienna, from 2?6 February, on the use of nuclear techniques in animal production. Among the topics discussed at the symposium were: Soil-plant-animal relations regarding minerals, Trace elements in animal nutrition, Calcium, phosphorus and magnesium metabolism, Protein (nitrogen) metabolism - ruminants Protein (nitrogen) metabolism - non-ruminants Nuclear techniques in the control of parasitic infections Animal endocrinology with special emphasis on radioimmunoassays.}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {2}
volume = {18}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1976}
month = {Jul}
}