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Protein improvement in crop plants

Journal Article:

Abstract

There are compelling reasons for attempting to increase the quality and quantity of protein available in crop plants through plant breeding, despite the fact that some critics have argued that no worldwide protein shortage exists. What used to be thought of as a 'protein gap' has now come to be considered in terms of protein-calorie malnutrition. This is only right since protein and calorie nutrition are inextricable. t the moment there are still unanswered questions as to the precise protein requirements of humans as a function of age, health and ambient conditions. There are, in addition, some indications that the incidence of Kwashiorkor (protein deficiency disease) is increasing in different parts of the world. At a recent meeting of the Protein Advisory Group of the United Nations System, Dr. Jean Mayer, an eminent human nutritionist of Harvard University, U.S.A., indicated the reasons for concern for the current food situation generally, and the protein food supply in particular. These factors include: - Immoderate continuing human population increases, most pronounced in some poor developing countries. - The highly accelerated consumption of animal foods associated with increasing affluence in the richer countries of the world. The production of such foods as meat demands  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1974
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: 1 photo
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AFRICA; AGRICULTURE; ASIA; CROPS; CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; FISHERIES; FISHES; MEAT; NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY; PLANT BREEDING; PLANTS; PRODUCTIVITY; PROTEINS; SHORTAGES; UNITED NATIONS
OSTI ID:
21024968
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA08N0327046508
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull165/16505702225.pdf;INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 22-25
Announcement Date:
May 31, 2008

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Rabson, R. Protein improvement in crop plants. IAEA: N. p., 1974. Web.
Rabson, R. Protein improvement in crop plants. IAEA.
Rabson, R. 1974. "Protein improvement in crop plants." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21024968,
title = {Protein improvement in crop plants}
author = {Rabson, R}
abstractNote = {There are compelling reasons for attempting to increase the quality and quantity of protein available in crop plants through plant breeding, despite the fact that some critics have argued that no worldwide protein shortage exists. What used to be thought of as a 'protein gap' has now come to be considered in terms of protein-calorie malnutrition. This is only right since protein and calorie nutrition are inextricable. t the moment there are still unanswered questions as to the precise protein requirements of humans as a function of age, health and ambient conditions. There are, in addition, some indications that the incidence of Kwashiorkor (protein deficiency disease) is increasing in different parts of the world. At a recent meeting of the Protein Advisory Group of the United Nations System, Dr. Jean Mayer, an eminent human nutritionist of Harvard University, U.S.A., indicated the reasons for concern for the current food situation generally, and the protein food supply in particular. These factors include: - Immoderate continuing human population increases, most pronounced in some poor developing countries. - The highly accelerated consumption of animal foods associated with increasing affluence in the richer countries of the world. The production of such foods as meat demands great expenditures of grain, which is an inefficient mode of obtaining the required calories and protein for human consumption. - The over-exploitation of many of the world's fishery resources resulting in reduced yields, perhaps irreversibly, of some fishes. - Recent price increases in petroleum and fertilizer products which have imposed a major obstacle to increasing crop production. - The apparent alteration of climates in places like Africa, Asia and other parts of the Northern hemisphere which may put significant restrictions on crop production. hey are cogent reasons to be seriously concerned about these matters. (author)}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {5}
volume = {16}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1974}
month = {Jul}
}