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Energy systems

Journal Article:

Abstract

Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such  More>>
Authors:
Haefele, W; [1]  International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)]
  1. Nuclear Research Centre, Applied Systems Analysis and Reactor Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1974
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 1-2; Other Information: 35 refs, 17 figs, 15 tabs
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ECOLOGY; ECONOMY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY SYSTEMS; ENVIRONMENT; POWER TRANSMISSION; RELIABILITY; RESERVES; STEAM TURBINES
OSTI ID:
21024938
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA08N0297046478
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull161_2/161_204090348.pdf;INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 3-48
Announcement Date:
May 31, 2008

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Haefele, W, and International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)]. Energy systems. IAEA: N. p., 1974. Web.
Haefele, W, & International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)]. Energy systems. IAEA.
Haefele, W, and International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)]. 1974. "Energy systems." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21024938,
title = {Energy systems}
author = {Haefele, W, and International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)]}
abstractNote = {Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the problem. (author)}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {1-2}
volume = {16}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1974}
month = {Jul}
}