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Laguna Verde - A photo story

Journal Article:

Abstract

Safety is one of the main factors in the construction and operation of a modern nuclear power plant. There are many barriers between the fission products produced in the fuel elements of the core, and the environment: the cladding of the fuel pins which are enclosed in the reactor core, the pressure vessel containing the core and which in turn is enclosed in the reactor containment, all this being located in a low-pressure secondary containment or reactor building. Despite these precautions, nuclear safety is still a widely-discussed issue. The important fact remains, however, that there has not been a single radiation-induced fatality or serious injury at any civilian nuclear power plant during 20 years of nuclear power generation. This includes the accident that occurred in March 1979 at the Three Mile Island nuclear plant in the USA. A substantial component contributing to safety in a nuclear power plant is the containment. The following photos of Laguna Verde, Mexico's first nuclear power station being constructed at Alta Lucero in Vera Cruz, give an impression of how strong this concrete and steel containment actually is. Laguna Verde consists of two 600 MWe units and the plant is scheduled for commercial operation in  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Apr 15, 1980
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IAEA Bulletin; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: 10 photos
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; CONTAINMENT BUILDINGS; CONTAINMENT SYSTEMS; COOLING PONDS; FISSION PRODUCTS; LEAKS; REACTOR SAFETY; REINFORCED CONCRETE; STEELS; THREE MILE ISLAND-1 REACTOR; THREE MILE ISLAND-2 REACTOR
OSTI ID:
21003644
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-6067; IAEBAB; TRN: XA0703560027767
Availability:
Available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Magazines/Bulletin/Bull222/22204780310.pdf;INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 2-10
Announcement Date:
Apr 19, 2008

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Laguna Verde - A photo story. IAEA: N. p., 1980. Web.
Laguna Verde - A photo story. IAEA.
1980. "Laguna Verde - A photo story." IAEA.
@misc{etde_21003644,
title = {Laguna Verde - A photo story}
abstractNote = {Safety is one of the main factors in the construction and operation of a modern nuclear power plant. There are many barriers between the fission products produced in the fuel elements of the core, and the environment: the cladding of the fuel pins which are enclosed in the reactor core, the pressure vessel containing the core and which in turn is enclosed in the reactor containment, all this being located in a low-pressure secondary containment or reactor building. Despite these precautions, nuclear safety is still a widely-discussed issue. The important fact remains, however, that there has not been a single radiation-induced fatality or serious injury at any civilian nuclear power plant during 20 years of nuclear power generation. This includes the accident that occurred in March 1979 at the Three Mile Island nuclear plant in the USA. A substantial component contributing to safety in a nuclear power plant is the containment. The following photos of Laguna Verde, Mexico's first nuclear power station being constructed at Alta Lucero in Vera Cruz, give an impression of how strong this concrete and steel containment actually is. Laguna Verde consists of two 600 MWe units and the plant is scheduled for commercial operation in 1982. Construction began in 1974. Both units are boiling-water reactors. The photos show, in general, the construction of the primary containment for the reactors (the dry wells). The dry well contains the reactor itself and has two layers: the leak-tight steel liner and the heavy concrete building. The purpose of the primary containment is to retain steam and gases that might escape in an emergency and to direct these through relief tubes to a water pond for cooling. Surrounding this primary containment will be a reactor building which serves as a secondary low-pressure containment, able to operate at pressures up to 0.2 atmospheres.}
journal = {IAEA Bulletin}
issue = {2}
volume = {22}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1980}
month = {Apr}
}