You need JavaScript to view this

Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material

Abstract

Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in most material. The most common naturally occurring radionuclides in material are those of the uranium and thorium series and potassium-40. This material is commonly referred to as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some material the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides are significantly higher, to the extent that regulatory control may be required for radiation protection purposes. Regulation of NORM presents a range of new challenges for both regulators and operators. Unlike more traditional industries dealing with radionuclides, NORM industries have generally not had any radiological oversight and, for example, are not equipped for radiological monitoring. Some consumer goods containing NORM, which have not traditionally been considered as a radiological problem (such as some fertilizers), may require regulation and this may have social and economic consequences. The transport and disposal of NORM are also a concern, particularly due to the large volumes, which may need to be considered. For the majority of NORM, disposal has been by conventional means in the same way as for non-hazardous waste with no specific attention to radiological aspects. In some cases, there may be a need for intervention into existing NORM disposal sites. The International Commission on Radiological  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2005
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-812
Resource Relation:
Conference: Specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material, Vienna (Austria), 23-27 Sep 2002; Other Information: Refs and tabs
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; IAEA; ICRP; MEETINGS; MILLING; MINING; NATURAL RADIOACTIVITY; POTASSIUM 40; PROCEEDINGS; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RAW MATERIALS; REVIEWS; SAFETY; THORIUM; THORIUM ORES; URANIUM
OSTI ID:
20967231
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0501045115556
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
300 pages
Announcement Date:
Jan 04, 2008

Citation Formats

Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material. IAEA: N. p., 2005. Web.
Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material. IAEA.
2005. "Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20967231,
title = {Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material}
abstractNote = {Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in most material. The most common naturally occurring radionuclides in material are those of the uranium and thorium series and potassium-40. This material is commonly referred to as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some material the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides are significantly higher, to the extent that regulatory control may be required for radiation protection purposes. Regulation of NORM presents a range of new challenges for both regulators and operators. Unlike more traditional industries dealing with radionuclides, NORM industries have generally not had any radiological oversight and, for example, are not equipped for radiological monitoring. Some consumer goods containing NORM, which have not traditionally been considered as a radiological problem (such as some fertilizers), may require regulation and this may have social and economic consequences. The transport and disposal of NORM are also a concern, particularly due to the large volumes, which may need to be considered. For the majority of NORM, disposal has been by conventional means in the same way as for non-hazardous waste with no specific attention to radiological aspects. In some cases, there may be a need for intervention into existing NORM disposal sites. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published ICRP No. 82, Protection of the Public in Situations of Prolonged Radiation Exposure in 2000. This document provides guidance on managing residues, such as those arising from NORM industries, with potential impact on the public. However, with NORM residual waste there may be three different situations: residual waste created as the result of a past practice, residual waste created by an ongoing practice and waste which will arise from future activities. Regulation of NORM may therefore be consistent with consideration of a practice, an intervention or a combination of both. Different regulatory approaches are used nationally and a review of the regulation of NORM is timely. The mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores and the management of the waste generated from such activities is the subject of several safety documents of the IAEA. An assessment of occupational protection conditions in workplaces with high levels of exposure to natural radiation was made through an IAEA Technical Committee Meeting held in 2001. The findings of this meeting are forming the basis for a work plan for future activities in this area and for a Safety Guide on occupational radiation protection in mining and processing of raw material, as well as two related safety reports. However, there is a range of radiation protection issues, arising from the mining, processing, utilisation and disposal of NORM, which have not yet been covered in IAEA safety documents. These include impacts on the public and the environment of the processing of NORM and the associated generation of waste.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2005}
month = {Jul}
}