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Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy'

Abstract

Radionuclide therapy (RNT) employing radiopharmaceuticals labelled with emitting radionuclides is fast emerging as an important part of nuclear medicine. Radionuclide therapy is effectively utilized for bone pain palliation, thus providing significant improvement in quality of life of patients suffering from pain resulting from bone metastasis. Targeting primary diseases by using specific carrier molecules labelled with radionuclides is also widely investigated and efficacious products have been emerging for the treatment of Lymphoma and Neuroendocrine tumours. In order to ensure the wider use of radiopharmaceuticals, it is essential to carefully consider the choice of radionuclides that together with the carrier molecules will give suitable pharmacokinetic properties and therapeutic efficacy. The criteria for the selection of a radionuclide for radiotherapy are suitable decay characteristics and amenable chemistry. However, the practical considerations in selecting a radionuclide for targeted therapy are availability in high radionuclidic purity as well as high specific activity and low production cost and comfortable delivery logistics. {sup 177}Lu is one of the isotopes emerging as a clear choice for therapy. Worldwide, the isotope is under investigation for approximately 30 different clinical applications, including treatment of colon cancer, metastatic bone cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lung cancer. {sup 177}Lu decays with a half-life  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2006
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-970
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy', Vienna (Austria), 4-8 Dec 2006; Other Information: Refs, figs, tabs
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CLINICAL TRIALS; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; COST; GAMMA CAMERAS; IODINE 131; LABELLING; LARGE INTESTINE; LUNGS; LUTETIUM 177; LYMPHOMAS; MAMMARY GLANDS; METASTASES; PAIN; PATIENTS; PEPTIDES; PROSTATE; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; RADIOTHERAPY; RESEARCH REACTORS; SAMARIUM 153; SKELETON; STRONTIUM 89; YTTRIUM 90
OSTI ID:
20858376
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0700603030658
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
180 pages
Announcement Date:
May 04, 2007

Citation Formats

Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy'. IAEA: N. p., 2006. Web.
Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy'. IAEA.
2006. "Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy'." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20858376,
title = {Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy'}
abstractNote = {Radionuclide therapy (RNT) employing radiopharmaceuticals labelled with emitting radionuclides is fast emerging as an important part of nuclear medicine. Radionuclide therapy is effectively utilized for bone pain palliation, thus providing significant improvement in quality of life of patients suffering from pain resulting from bone metastasis. Targeting primary diseases by using specific carrier molecules labelled with radionuclides is also widely investigated and efficacious products have been emerging for the treatment of Lymphoma and Neuroendocrine tumours. In order to ensure the wider use of radiopharmaceuticals, it is essential to carefully consider the choice of radionuclides that together with the carrier molecules will give suitable pharmacokinetic properties and therapeutic efficacy. The criteria for the selection of a radionuclide for radiotherapy are suitable decay characteristics and amenable chemistry. However, the practical considerations in selecting a radionuclide for targeted therapy are availability in high radionuclidic purity as well as high specific activity and low production cost and comfortable delivery logistics. {sup 177}Lu is one of the isotopes emerging as a clear choice for therapy. Worldwide, the isotope is under investigation for approximately 30 different clinical applications, including treatment of colon cancer, metastatic bone cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lung cancer. {sup 177}Lu decays with a half-life of 6.71 d by emission of particles with E{sub max} of 497 keV (78.6%), 384 keV (9.1%) and 176 keV (12.2%). It also emits photons of 113 keV (6.4%) and 208 keV (11%), that are ideally suited for imaging the in-vivo localization and dosimetric calculations applying a gamma camera. The physical half-life of {sup 177}Lu is comparable to that of {sup 131}I, the most widely used therapeutic radionuclide. The long halflife of {sup 177}Lu provides logistic advantage for production, QA/QC of the products as well as feasibility to supply the products to places far away from the production site. Patients suffering from breast, lung and prostate cancer develop metastasis in bone in the advanced stage of their diseases and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP and {sup 89}SrCl2 are used effectively for pain palliation due to skeletal metastases. Despite the fact that the above bone pain palliating agents give good clinical results; their wider use has met with practical difficulties. Though {sup 153}Sm can be prepared in adequate quantities in medium flux reactors, its short half life (47 h) is the major disadvantage. It is essential to handle large quantities of activity to compensate for decay losses, during production and delivery of the radiopharmaceutical. In the case of {sup 89}Sr, there is very limited capacity for production due to the very low cross section making this product expensive and unaffordable for many patients. It is expected that a {sup 177}Lu based bone palliating agent will offer the same clinical efficacy without the disadvantages mentioned above. Currently there is good published data available on the production of {sup 177}Lu and the preparation of phosphonates based radiopharmaceuticals which show high bone uptake. {sup 177}Lu produced in the low to medium flux research reactors available in the MS can be used for bone pain palliation. High specific activity {sup 177}Lu that is prepared in high flux research reactors is needed for radiolabelling antibodies and peptides. These antibodies introduced to patients alone or in conjunction with {sup 90}Y products are showing promising results in clinical trials. Large quantities of high specific activity {sup 177}Lu can be prepared by irradiating enriched targets in high flux research reactors and hence, in the long term the cost of high specific activity {sup 177}Lu should come down to reasonable levels. The wider availability of {sup 177}Lu will make it feasible for the production of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals with lower cost ensuring higher availability in MS. The CRP 'Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on {sup 177}Lu for Radionuclide Therapy' aims at developing therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation and targeted therapy of cancer.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2006}
month = {Jul}
}