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Brominated flame retardants in the Arctic. An overview of spatial and temporal trends

Abstract

The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), which entered into force on May 17, 2004, includes wording that chemicals with the characteristics of POPs are those found in locations ''distant from sources'' and those for which ''monitoring data showing that long-range environmental transport of the chemical may have occurred''. Thus, the Arctic has become an important indicator region for assessment of persistence and bioaccumulation. The Arctic environment is well suited as a region in which to evaluate POPs. Some regions of thee Arctic, particularly the Barents Sea area north of Norway and western Russia are relatively close to source regions of POPs. Cold conditions favor persistence of POPs relative to temperate or tropical environments. The presence of fourth level carnivores (e.g. polar bears and seabirds), and storage of lipid as an energy source, make Arctic food webs vulnerable to bioaccumulative chemicals. Indigenous people in the Arctic utilizing a traditional diet, which is high in nutritionally beneficial fat, results in their elevated exposure to some POPs. The first indication that brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were reaching the Arctic was the detection by Jansson et al. of lower molecular weight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Svalbard Brunnichfs guillemots (130 ng/g lipid  More>>
Authors:
Wit, C de; [1]  Alaee, M; Muir, D [2] 
  1. Institute of Applied Environmental Research, Stockholm (Sweden)
  2. National Water Research Institute, Burlington, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2004
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
ETDE-DE-1546
Resource Relation:
Conference: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs, Berlin (Germany), 6-10 Sep 2004; Related Information: In: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs. Proceedings, Organohalogen Compounds v. 66, 4035 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BROMINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; PHENYL ETHER; FIRE RESISTANCE; ADDITIVES; ARCTIC REGIONS; ABUNDANCE; REVIEWS; RISK ASSESSMENT; AIR POLLUTION; LAND POLLUTION; WILD ANIMALS; HUMAN POPULATIONS
Sponsoring Organizations:
Bundesmin. fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Bonn (Germany)
OSTI ID:
20828414
Research Organizations:
Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 3-928379-30-5; TRN: DE07G1105
Availability:
Available as CD-ROM; www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/20828414-d8cnaj/; Commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20828414
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
page(s) 3764-3769
Announcement Date:
Jan 27, 2007

Citation Formats

Wit, C de, Alaee, M, and Muir, D. Brominated flame retardants in the Arctic. An overview of spatial and temporal trends. Germany: N. p., 2004. Web.
Wit, C de, Alaee, M, & Muir, D. Brominated flame retardants in the Arctic. An overview of spatial and temporal trends. Germany.
Wit, C de, Alaee, M, and Muir, D. 2004. "Brominated flame retardants in the Arctic. An overview of spatial and temporal trends." Germany.
@misc{etde_20828414,
title = {Brominated flame retardants in the Arctic. An overview of spatial and temporal trends}
author = {Wit, C de, Alaee, M, and Muir, D}
abstractNote = {The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), which entered into force on May 17, 2004, includes wording that chemicals with the characteristics of POPs are those found in locations ''distant from sources'' and those for which ''monitoring data showing that long-range environmental transport of the chemical may have occurred''. Thus, the Arctic has become an important indicator region for assessment of persistence and bioaccumulation. The Arctic environment is well suited as a region in which to evaluate POPs. Some regions of thee Arctic, particularly the Barents Sea area north of Norway and western Russia are relatively close to source regions of POPs. Cold conditions favor persistence of POPs relative to temperate or tropical environments. The presence of fourth level carnivores (e.g. polar bears and seabirds), and storage of lipid as an energy source, make Arctic food webs vulnerable to bioaccumulative chemicals. Indigenous people in the Arctic utilizing a traditional diet, which is high in nutritionally beneficial fat, results in their elevated exposure to some POPs. The first indication that brominated flame retardants (BFRs) were reaching the Arctic was the detection by Jansson et al. of lower molecular weight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Svalbard Brunnichfs guillemots (130 ng/g lipid weight) and ringed seals (40 ng/g lw) collected in 1981. Whitefish collected from Lake Storvindeln in 1986, a pristine mountain lake in the Swedish mountains near Ammarnas, had {sigma}PBDE levels of 26 ng/g lw. Despite these early findings, only recently have the spatial and temporal trends of BFRs been studied in detail in the Arctic. The purpose of this paper is to review the new data on BFRs in the Arctic and assess whether this information supports the view that PBDEs and other BFRs of similar molecular weight are POPs and potential global pollutants. This review is based on a recent assessment of POPs in the Arctic combined with newer data not available for that assessment. Unless otherwise noted, {sigma}PBDE denotes the sum of lower brominated congeners. If DecaBDE (BDE209) was quantified, this is indicated.}
place = {Germany}
year = {2004}
month = {Sep}
}