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Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds

Abstract

Pharmaceuticals are a highly variable group of organic compounds with the potential to cause harm to aquatic ecosystems and human health. Thousands of tones of pharmacologically active substances are used annually but surprisingly little is known about their ultimate fate in the environment. The data collected to date, rarely provide information on the processes that determine their environmental fate and although they receive considerable pharmacological and clinical testing during development, knowledge of their ecotoxicity is poor. One major concern is that antibiotics found in sewage effluent may cause increased resistance amongst natural bacterial populations. The debate over risks associated with chemicals in the environment represents more than just another disagreement in the scientific community. It has opened the door to a new way of thinking about the onset of uninherited diseases, the nature of scientific investigation, and the role of scientific knowledge in the policymaking process. For example, research evidence on endocrine disruption collected over the last few years has changed dramatically the way we think about chemical risks. In part, this change has also been attributed to the precautionary principle, as a new approach to environmental policy forged in Europe. The term ''precautionary approach'' declares an obligation to control  More>>
Authors:
Voulvoulis, N [1] 
  1. Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2004
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
ETDE-DE-1546
Resource Relation:
Conference: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs, Berlin (Germany), 6-10 Sep 2004; Related Information: In: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs. Proceedings, Organohalogen Compounds v. 66, 4035 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DRUGS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; RISK ASSESSMENT; TOXICITY; POLLUTION REGULATIONS
Sponsoring Organizations:
Bundesmin. fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Bonn (Germany)
OSTI ID:
20828364
Research Organizations:
Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 3-928379-30-5; TRN: DE07G1155
Availability:
Available as CD-ROM; www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/20828364-7GfKGs/; Commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20828364
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
page(s) 3433-3442
Announcement Date:
Jan 27, 2007

Citation Formats

Voulvoulis, N. Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds. Germany: N. p., 2004. Web.
Voulvoulis, N. Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds. Germany.
Voulvoulis, N. 2004. "Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds." Germany.
@misc{etde_20828364,
title = {Environmental risk management for pharmaceutical compounds}
author = {Voulvoulis, N}
abstractNote = {Pharmaceuticals are a highly variable group of organic compounds with the potential to cause harm to aquatic ecosystems and human health. Thousands of tones of pharmacologically active substances are used annually but surprisingly little is known about their ultimate fate in the environment. The data collected to date, rarely provide information on the processes that determine their environmental fate and although they receive considerable pharmacological and clinical testing during development, knowledge of their ecotoxicity is poor. One major concern is that antibiotics found in sewage effluent may cause increased resistance amongst natural bacterial populations. The debate over risks associated with chemicals in the environment represents more than just another disagreement in the scientific community. It has opened the door to a new way of thinking about the onset of uninherited diseases, the nature of scientific investigation, and the role of scientific knowledge in the policymaking process. For example, research evidence on endocrine disruption collected over the last few years has changed dramatically the way we think about chemical risks. In part, this change has also been attributed to the precautionary principle, as a new approach to environmental policy forged in Europe. The term ''precautionary approach'' declares an obligation to control the dangerous substances even before a definitive causal link had been established between the chemicals and health or environmental effects, and represents a radical departure from traditional approaches to risk assessment and particularly risk management, which includes an integration of the assessment, communication and mitigation of risks.}
place = {Germany}
year = {2004}
month = {Sep}
}