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Estimating the total TEQ in human blood from naturally-occurring vs. anthropogenic dioxins. A dietary study

Abstract

Numerous naturally-occurring compounds in the human diet can bind to the aryl hydrocarbon, or dioxin receptor (AhR) and activate the AhR signaling pathway. These compounds include certain indole carbinols and their derivatives, heterocyclic aromatic amines, flavonoids, carotinoids, vitamin A derivatives (retinoids), and tryptophan metabolites. Several researchers have suggested that the daily dietary intake of these ''endodioxins'', in terms of a TCDD-equivalency (TEQ) is likely to be far greater than that associated with daily background intake of anthropogenic dioxins. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary data for evaluating whether dietary endodioxins may in fact be significant contributors to the non-PCDD/F and PCB fraction of the blood TEQ. This was accomplished by measuring the total bioassay (CALUX {sup registered}) TEQ in the blood of several volunteers under various dietary regimens. Specifically, blood samples were collected from volunteers who maintained a baseline diet, which was relatively free of vegetables, followed by a diet enriched in endodioxin-containing vegetables. The background blood levels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs were measured for each volunteer at the beginning of the study in order to establish a baseline TEQ for each participant. To provide a measure of study sensitivity, CALUX {sup registered} analysis was also performed  More>>
Authors:
Connor, K; [1]  Harris, M; [2]  Edwards, M; [3]  Chu, A; Clark, G; [4]  Finley, B [5] 
  1. Exponent, Natick, MA (United States)
  2. Exponent, Houston, TX (United States)
  3. Exponent, Bellevue, WA (United States)
  4. XDS, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)
  5. Exponent, Santa Rosa, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2004
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
ETDE-DE-1546
Resource Relation:
Conference: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs, Berlin (Germany), 6-10 Sep 2004; Related Information: In: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs. Proceedings, Organohalogen Compounds v. 66, 4035 pages.
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; DIOXIN; TOXICITY; RECEPTORS; GENE REGULATION; DIET; BIOASSAY; BLOOD; POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS; FURANS; VEGETABLES
Sponsoring Organizations:
Bundesmin. fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Bonn (Germany)
OSTI ID:
20828362
Research Organizations:
Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 3-928379-30-5; TRN: DE07G1157
Availability:
Available as CD-ROM; www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/20828362-fmEILm/; Commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20828362
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
page(s) 3360-3365
Announcement Date:
Jan 27, 2007

Citation Formats

Connor, K, Harris, M, Edwards, M, Chu, A, Clark, G, and Finley, B. Estimating the total TEQ in human blood from naturally-occurring vs. anthropogenic dioxins. A dietary study. Germany: N. p., 2004. Web.
Connor, K, Harris, M, Edwards, M, Chu, A, Clark, G, & Finley, B. Estimating the total TEQ in human blood from naturally-occurring vs. anthropogenic dioxins. A dietary study. Germany.
Connor, K, Harris, M, Edwards, M, Chu, A, Clark, G, and Finley, B. 2004. "Estimating the total TEQ in human blood from naturally-occurring vs. anthropogenic dioxins. A dietary study." Germany.
@misc{etde_20828362,
title = {Estimating the total TEQ in human blood from naturally-occurring vs. anthropogenic dioxins. A dietary study}
author = {Connor, K, Harris, M, Edwards, M, Chu, A, Clark, G, and Finley, B}
abstractNote = {Numerous naturally-occurring compounds in the human diet can bind to the aryl hydrocarbon, or dioxin receptor (AhR) and activate the AhR signaling pathway. These compounds include certain indole carbinols and their derivatives, heterocyclic aromatic amines, flavonoids, carotinoids, vitamin A derivatives (retinoids), and tryptophan metabolites. Several researchers have suggested that the daily dietary intake of these ''endodioxins'', in terms of a TCDD-equivalency (TEQ) is likely to be far greater than that associated with daily background intake of anthropogenic dioxins. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary data for evaluating whether dietary endodioxins may in fact be significant contributors to the non-PCDD/F and PCB fraction of the blood TEQ. This was accomplished by measuring the total bioassay (CALUX {sup registered}) TEQ in the blood of several volunteers under various dietary regimens. Specifically, blood samples were collected from volunteers who maintained a baseline diet, which was relatively free of vegetables, followed by a diet enriched in endodioxin-containing vegetables. The background blood levels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs were measured for each volunteer at the beginning of the study in order to establish a baseline TEQ for each participant. To provide a measure of study sensitivity, CALUX {sup registered} analysis was also performed on blood samples from volunteers who took an off-the-shelf indole-3-carbinole (I3C) supplement. I3C is the main dietary ICZ precursor and could be expected to increase the levels of this endodioxin in blood.}
place = {Germany}
year = {2004}
month = {Sep}
}