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Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

Abstract

Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the  More>>
Authors:
Huetteroth, A; Putschew, A; Jekel, M [1] 
  1. Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2004
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
ETDE-DE-1546
Resource Relation:
Conference: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs, Berlin (Germany), 6-10 Sep 2004; Related Information: In: Dioxin 2004: 24. international symposium on halogenated environmental organic pollutants and POPs. Proceedings, Organohalogen Compounds v. 66, 4035 pages.
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ALGAE; ORGANIC BROMINE COMPOUNDS; LAKES; NATURAL OCCURRENCE; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; MONTHLY VARIATIONS; CHLOROPHYLL; CORRELATIONS; CYANOBACTERIA; BATCH CULTURE
Sponsoring Organizations:
Bundesmin. fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Bonn (Germany)
OSTI ID:
20827873
Research Organizations:
Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 3-928379-30-5; TRN: DE07G1646
Availability:
Available as CD-ROM; www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/20827873-jqpm1s/; Commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20827873
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
page(s) 382-387
Announcement Date:
Jan 29, 2007

Citation Formats

Huetteroth, A, Putschew, A, and Jekel, M. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters. Germany: N. p., 2004. Web.
Huetteroth, A, Putschew, A, & Jekel, M. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters. Germany.
Huetteroth, A, Putschew, A, and Jekel, M. 2004. "Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters." Germany.
@misc{etde_20827873,
title = {Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters}
author = {Huetteroth, A, Putschew, A, and Jekel, M}
abstractNote = {Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.}
place = {Germany}
year = {2004}
month = {Sep}
}