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Clinical evaluation of treatment plans

Conference:

Abstract

Since the start of radiotherapy, the aim of all radiotherapists has been to treat as many patients who suffer with malignant tumours as possible, so as to give an effective curative dose to the whole tumour, at the same time, doing as little damage as possible to normal tissues. Until 1945, damage to the skin was usually the limiting factor. Since the war, with the rapid development of more powerful X-ray machines and sources of irradiation, we have had at our disposal much more penetrating radiation, allowing us to give effective tumour doses, with little or no damage to the skin. However, with higher tumour doses, there is more likelihood of damage to structures in proximity to the tumour - i.e. bone, nerves, muscle, liver, kidney etc. This has focussed the interest of all radiologists on the need for careful planning, and physicists have worked out with great care the differential absorptions of X-rays on differing tissue, i. e. bone, muscle, fat etc., so that very accurate and correct treatment planning can now be undertaken. This entails a great deal of accurate and complicated work and has had to be done by our physicist colleagues, who may take hours or  More>>
Authors:
Emery, E W [1] 
  1. Radiotherapy Department, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1966
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
STI/DOC-10/57
Resource Relation:
Conference: Panel on computer calculation of dose distributions in radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria), 18-22 Oct 1965; Other Information: 2 figs; Related Information: In: Computer calculation of dose distributions in radiotherapy. Report of a panel, Technical reports seriesno. 57, 225 pages.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; DATA PROCESSING; EVALUATION; HOSPITALS; IRRADIATION; NEOPLASMS; ORGANS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIOTHERAPY; SKIN; X-RAY EQUIPMENT
OSTI ID:
20808510
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1914; TRN: XA0602232110002
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 177-181
Announcement Date:
Dec 29, 2006

Conference:

Citation Formats

Emery, E W. Clinical evaluation of treatment plans. IAEA: N. p., 1966. Web.
Emery, E W. Clinical evaluation of treatment plans. IAEA.
Emery, E W. 1966. "Clinical evaluation of treatment plans." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20808510,
title = {Clinical evaluation of treatment plans}
author = {Emery, E W}
abstractNote = {Since the start of radiotherapy, the aim of all radiotherapists has been to treat as many patients who suffer with malignant tumours as possible, so as to give an effective curative dose to the whole tumour, at the same time, doing as little damage as possible to normal tissues. Until 1945, damage to the skin was usually the limiting factor. Since the war, with the rapid development of more powerful X-ray machines and sources of irradiation, we have had at our disposal much more penetrating radiation, allowing us to give effective tumour doses, with little or no damage to the skin. However, with higher tumour doses, there is more likelihood of damage to structures in proximity to the tumour - i.e. bone, nerves, muscle, liver, kidney etc. This has focussed the interest of all radiologists on the need for careful planning, and physicists have worked out with great care the differential absorptions of X-rays on differing tissue, i. e. bone, muscle, fat etc., so that very accurate and correct treatment planning can now be undertaken. This entails a great deal of accurate and complicated work and has had to be done by our physicist colleagues, who may take hours or days to work out a complicated treatment plan. The acceptance of the plan as being the most suitable for a patient is governed by these factors: (a) The dose must be given to the whole tumour area; (b) The nearby structures, i. e. nerves, bowel, kidney etc. must not receive a dose which may cause serious damage; (c) All parts of the tumour must have an effective dose; (d) The integral dose must be such that the patient is not unduly upset. All these factors vary from patient to patient, and thus each plan has to be considered in conjunction with each individual patient so that, although patients have similar tumours, what may be an optimal plan for one may not be for another. Also clinicians themselves vary in their opinions on the size of tumour, general condition of the patient, and the amount of damage they think justifiable to inflict upon patients.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1966}
month = {Jun}
}