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Radioactive contamination of copper produced using nuclear explosives

Abstract

Laboratory tests simulating the processing of copper ore after fracturing with nuclear explosives indicate that only very small fractions of the radioactive fission products will be dissolved on leaching with dilute sulfuric acid. Tritium (as tritiated water) will be by far the dominant radionuclide in the circulating leach liquor, assuming use of a fusion device. Only 106Ru appears of significant importance with respect to contamination of the cement copper. It is rejected effectively in electrolytic purification and, therefore, the final copper product should be very low in radiocontamination and not hazardous to the customer. The activity level may be high enough, however, to make the copper unsuitable for some specific uses. If necessary, solvent extraction can be used as an alternative to the cementation process to reduce the radioactivity of the copper products. The tritium in the circulating liquor and the 106Ru in the cement copper are potential hazards at the plant site and must be given consideration in designing and operating the facility. However since the activity levels will be low, the protection necessary to ensure safety of the operating personnel should be neither difficult nor costly to provide. (author)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.2); INIS-XA-N-229
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 3 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Volume 2, 935 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ACTIVITY LEVELS; COPPER ORES; ELECTROLYSIS; FISSION PRODUCTS; FRACTURING; LEACHING; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; PURIFICATION; RUTHENIUM 106
OSTI ID:
20768855
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hindsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0926075322
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1569-1588
Announcement Date:
Sep 25, 2006

Citation Formats

Crouse, D J, Arnold, W D, and Hurst, F J. Radioactive contamination of copper produced using nuclear explosives. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Crouse, D J, Arnold, W D, & Hurst, F J. Radioactive contamination of copper produced using nuclear explosives. IAEA.
Crouse, D J, Arnold, W D, and Hurst, F J. 1970. "Radioactive contamination of copper produced using nuclear explosives." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20768855,
title = {Radioactive contamination of copper produced using nuclear explosives}
author = {Crouse, D J, Arnold, W D, and Hurst, F J}
abstractNote = {Laboratory tests simulating the processing of copper ore after fracturing with nuclear explosives indicate that only very small fractions of the radioactive fission products will be dissolved on leaching with dilute sulfuric acid. Tritium (as tritiated water) will be by far the dominant radionuclide in the circulating leach liquor, assuming use of a fusion device. Only 106Ru appears of significant importance with respect to contamination of the cement copper. It is rejected effectively in electrolytic purification and, therefore, the final copper product should be very low in radiocontamination and not hazardous to the customer. The activity level may be high enough, however, to make the copper unsuitable for some specific uses. If necessary, solvent extraction can be used as an alternative to the cementation process to reduce the radioactivity of the copper products. The tritium in the circulating liquor and the 106Ru in the cement copper are potential hazards at the plant site and must be given consideration in designing and operating the facility. However since the activity levels will be low, the protection necessary to ensure safety of the operating personnel should be neither difficult nor costly to provide. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}