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Oil shale research related to proposed nuclear projects

Abstract

The Bureau of Mines is conducting research to develop data pertinent to in situ retorting of oil shale fractured by a nuclear explosion or other means. Maximum utilization of the Green River oil shale found in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, at depths ranging from outcrops to several thousand feet, requires development of several methods of processing. Early research was devoted to developing processes for application to oil shale occurring at depths suitable for mining. In present research, the emphasis is on in situ retorting and recovery processes that would be more satisfactory for oil shales occurring at greater depths. Development of an in situ process depends upon finding or establishing sufficient permeability in the oil shale beds for the passage of fluids which serve as a heat carrier in bringing the oil shale to retorting temperature. Use of a nuclear explosive seems to offer the best chance for successfully fracturing the thicker and more deeply buried portions of the deposit to give the required permeability. Processing the very large quantity of broken and fractured oil shale that would be produced presents many problems which require new background data for their solution. This paper describes research the Bureau of Mines is  More>>
Authors:
Carpenter, H C; Sohns, H W; Dinneen, G U [1] 
  1. Laramie Petroleum Research Center, Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, Laramie, WY (United States)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.2); INIS-XA-N-229
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 11 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Volume 2, 935 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; GREEN RIVER FORMATION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; OIL SHALE DEPOSITS; OIL SHALE MINING; PLOWSHARE PROJECT; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; UNDERGROUND MINING; US BUREAU OF MINES
OSTI ID:
20768843
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hindsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0914075310
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1364-1375
Announcement Date:
Sep 23, 2006

Citation Formats

Carpenter, H C, Sohns, H W, and Dinneen, G U. Oil shale research related to proposed nuclear projects. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Carpenter, H C, Sohns, H W, & Dinneen, G U. Oil shale research related to proposed nuclear projects. IAEA.
Carpenter, H C, Sohns, H W, and Dinneen, G U. 1970. "Oil shale research related to proposed nuclear projects." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20768843,
title = {Oil shale research related to proposed nuclear projects}
author = {Carpenter, H C, Sohns, H W, and Dinneen, G U}
abstractNote = {The Bureau of Mines is conducting research to develop data pertinent to in situ retorting of oil shale fractured by a nuclear explosion or other means. Maximum utilization of the Green River oil shale found in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, at depths ranging from outcrops to several thousand feet, requires development of several methods of processing. Early research was devoted to developing processes for application to oil shale occurring at depths suitable for mining. In present research, the emphasis is on in situ retorting and recovery processes that would be more satisfactory for oil shales occurring at greater depths. Development of an in situ process depends upon finding or establishing sufficient permeability in the oil shale beds for the passage of fluids which serve as a heat carrier in bringing the oil shale to retorting temperature. Use of a nuclear explosive seems to offer the best chance for successfully fracturing the thicker and more deeply buried portions of the deposit to give the required permeability. Processing the very large quantity of broken and fractured oil shale that would be produced presents many problems which require new background data for their solution. This paper describes research the Bureau of Mines is conducting to develop pertinent data. Primarily this research involves laboratory determination of properties of oil shale, pilot scale investigation of retorting characteristics of ungraded broken shale, and underground combustion of shale fractured by pressure and chemical explosives. Application of the research results should aid in designing the oil recovery phase and provide an estimate of the quantity of oil that may be obtained in a nuclear experiment in oil shale. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}