You need JavaScript to view this

Why nuclear geostorage systems for petroleum?

Abstract

The objective of any kind of storage system in general is to act as a buffer between cyclical changes in supply and demand of the stored commodities. Since the advent of nuclear explosives engineering the possibility of constructing large-scale underground storage systems by means of contained nuclear explosions, for which the name nuclear geostorage has been coined, should be regarded as a valid alternative to the conventional storage systems currently in existence. Limiting this discussion to systems for storing crude oil, various options are available. The choice of any particular storage method depends, of course, on the circumstances surrounding each particular storage requirement; however, in many cases and for a variety of reasons, nuclear geostorage can be preferable to conventional solutions. Economic considerations are clearly among the most important ones. In this respect an increase in storage capacity will tend to favor the nuclear approach. Besides the economics, however, other considerations are important and may in some cases swing the balance in favor of nuclear geostorage plants, for instance: safety and strategic values, aesthetics, ease of access, lack of suitable tank farm space or lack of suitable geologic conditions for natural reservoirs. It should be borne in mind that the  More>>
Authors:
Harst, L van der; Knutson, C F [1] 
  1. CER Geonuclear Corporation, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.2); INIS-XA-N-229
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 17 refs, 13 figs; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Volume 2, 935 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ECONOMICS; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; NUCLEAR EXCAVATION; PETROLEUM; POLITICAL ASPECTS; PUBLIC RELATIONS; SAFETY; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; UNDERGROUND STORAGE
OSTI ID:
20768841
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hindsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0912075308
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1322-1342
Announcement Date:
Sep 25, 2006

Citation Formats

Harst, L van der, and Knutson, C F. Why nuclear geostorage systems for petroleum?. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Harst, L van der, & Knutson, C F. Why nuclear geostorage systems for petroleum?. IAEA.
Harst, L van der, and Knutson, C F. 1970. "Why nuclear geostorage systems for petroleum?" IAEA.
@misc{etde_20768841,
title = {Why nuclear geostorage systems for petroleum?}
author = {Harst, L van der, and Knutson, C F}
abstractNote = {The objective of any kind of storage system in general is to act as a buffer between cyclical changes in supply and demand of the stored commodities. Since the advent of nuclear explosives engineering the possibility of constructing large-scale underground storage systems by means of contained nuclear explosions, for which the name nuclear geostorage has been coined, should be regarded as a valid alternative to the conventional storage systems currently in existence. Limiting this discussion to systems for storing crude oil, various options are available. The choice of any particular storage method depends, of course, on the circumstances surrounding each particular storage requirement; however, in many cases and for a variety of reasons, nuclear geostorage can be preferable to conventional solutions. Economic considerations are clearly among the most important ones. In this respect an increase in storage capacity will tend to favor the nuclear approach. Besides the economics, however, other considerations are important and may in some cases swing the balance in favor of nuclear geostorage plants, for instance: safety and strategic values, aesthetics, ease of access, lack of suitable tank farm space or lack of suitable geologic conditions for natural reservoirs. It should be borne in mind that the decision to use the nuclear approach to solve a storage problem can only be taken after satisfactory evaluation of the geological and geographical characteristics of the site, and when the technical, safety, political, and public relations factors can be handled adequately. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}