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Nuclear explosives in water-resource management

Abstract

Nuclear explosives afford diverse tools for managing our water resources. These include principally: the rubble column of a fully contained underground detonation, the similar rubble column of a retarc, the crater by subsidence, the throwout crater of maximum volume (the latter either singly or in-line), and the ejecta of a valley-slope crater. By these tools, one can create space in which to store water, either underground or on the land surface - in the latter instance, to a considerable degree independently of the topography. Underground, one can accelerate movement of water by breaching a confining bed, a partition of a compartmented aquifer, or some other obstruction in the natural 'plumbing system'. Finally, on the land surface, one can modify the natural pattern of water flow, by canals excavated with in-line detonation. In all these applications, the potential advantage of a nuclear explosive rests chiefly in undertakings of large scale, under a consequent small cost per unit of mechanical work accomplished.
Authors:
Piper, Arthur M [1] 
  1. United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey (United States)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.2); INIS-XA-N-229
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 2 refs; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Volume 2, 935 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CRATERING EXPLOSIONS; CRATERS; INLAND WATERWAYS; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; WATER RESOURCES
OSTI ID:
20768827
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hindsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0894075294
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1164-1168
Announcement Date:
Sep 23, 2006

Citation Formats

Piper, Arthur M. Nuclear explosives in water-resource management. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Piper, Arthur M. Nuclear explosives in water-resource management. IAEA.
Piper, Arthur M. 1970. "Nuclear explosives in water-resource management." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20768827,
title = {Nuclear explosives in water-resource management}
author = {Piper, Arthur M}
abstractNote = {Nuclear explosives afford diverse tools for managing our water resources. These include principally: the rubble column of a fully contained underground detonation, the similar rubble column of a retarc, the crater by subsidence, the throwout crater of maximum volume (the latter either singly or in-line), and the ejecta of a valley-slope crater. By these tools, one can create space in which to store water, either underground or on the land surface - in the latter instance, to a considerable degree independently of the topography. Underground, one can accelerate movement of water by breaching a confining bed, a partition of a compartmented aquifer, or some other obstruction in the natural 'plumbing system'. Finally, on the land surface, one can modify the natural pattern of water flow, by canals excavated with in-line detonation. In all these applications, the potential advantage of a nuclear explosive rests chiefly in undertakings of large scale, under a consequent small cost per unit of mechanical work accomplished.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}