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Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event

Abstract

Reentry was made by mining into the chimney of broken rock created by a nuclear detonation in granite at a depth of 1500 feet. The chimney was 160 ft in radius and 890 ft high. An injection of radioactive melt was encountered at 300 ft from shot point. Radiochemical analyses determined that the yield of PILEDRIVER nuclear device was 61 {+-} 10 kt. Two samples of chimney rubble totalling over 5,000 lb were obtained during the postshot exploration. These samples of broken granite underwent screen analysis, a radioactivity-distribution study, and cursory leaching tests. The two samples were separated into 25 different size-fractions. An average of the particle-size data from the two samples showed that 17% of the material is between 20 mesh and I in.; 42% between 1 and 6 in.; and 34% between 6 in. and 3 ft. The distribution of radioactivity varies markedly with the particle size. The minus 100-mesh material comprizes less than 1.5% of the weight but contains almost 20% of the radioactivity. Small-scale batch-leaching tests showed that 25% of the radioactivity could be removed in a few hours by a film-percolation leach with distilled water, and 40% with dilute acid. Brief studies were made of  More>>
Authors:
Rabb, David D [1] 
  1. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.2); INIS-XA-N-229
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 21 refs, 13 figs, 4 tabs; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Volume 2, 935 pages.
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; DRILLING; ECONOMICS; FRACTURES; LEACHING; MINING ENGINEERING; NUCLEAR EXCAVATION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; RADIOACTIVITY; ROCKS; UNDERGROUND MINING
OSTI ID:
20768807
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hindsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0874075274
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 888-908
Announcement Date:
Sep 23, 2006

Citation Formats

Rabb, David D. Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Rabb, David D. Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event. IAEA.
Rabb, David D. 1970. "Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20768807,
title = {Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event}
author = {Rabb, David D}
abstractNote = {Reentry was made by mining into the chimney of broken rock created by a nuclear detonation in granite at a depth of 1500 feet. The chimney was 160 ft in radius and 890 ft high. An injection of radioactive melt was encountered at 300 ft from shot point. Radiochemical analyses determined that the yield of PILEDRIVER nuclear device was 61 {+-} 10 kt. Two samples of chimney rubble totalling over 5,000 lb were obtained during the postshot exploration. These samples of broken granite underwent screen analysis, a radioactivity-distribution study, and cursory leaching tests. The two samples were separated into 25 different size-fractions. An average of the particle-size data from the two samples showed that 17% of the material is between 20 mesh and I in.; 42% between 1 and 6 in.; and 34% between 6 in. and 3 ft. The distribution of radioactivity varies markedly with the particle size. The minus 100-mesh material comprizes less than 1.5% of the weight but contains almost 20% of the radioactivity. Small-scale batch-leaching tests showed that 25% of the radioactivity could be removed in a few hours by a film-percolation leach with distilled water, and 40% with dilute acid. Brief studies were made of the microfractures in the broken rock and of the radioactivity created by the PILEDRIVER explosion. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}