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Actinide recycle

Abstract

A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing  More>>
Authors:
Till, C; Chang, Y [1] 
  1. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1990
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-191; MIT-ANP-CP-001
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology, Cambridge, MA (United States), 4-5 Oct 1990; Related Information: In: Proceedings of the first MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology, 258 pages.
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ACTINIDES; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SAFETY; TOXICITY; WASTE MANAGEMENT
OSTI ID:
20767351
Research Organizations:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program for Advanced Nuclear Power Studies, Cambridge, MA (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2132073976
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
17 pages
Announcement Date:
Sep 25, 2006

Citation Formats

Till, C, and Chang, Y. Actinide recycle. IAEA: N. p., 1990. Web.
Till, C, & Chang, Y. Actinide recycle. IAEA.
Till, C, and Chang, Y. 1990. "Actinide recycle." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20767351,
title = {Actinide recycle}
author = {Till, C, and Chang, Y}
abstractNote = {A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1990}
month = {Jul}
}