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Nuclear power in Japan

Abstract

The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl  More>>
Authors:
Kishida, J [1] 
  1. Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1990
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-191; MIT-ANP-CP-001
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology, Cambridge, MA (United States), 4-5 Oct 1990; Related Information: In: Proceedings of the first MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology, 258 pages.
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; ACCIDENTS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; FALLOUT; JAPAN; MARKET; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR POWER; PUBLIC OPINION; REACTOR SAFETY
OSTI ID:
20767341
Research Organizations:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program for Advanced Nuclear Power Studies, Cambridge, MA (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2122073966
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
5 pages
Announcement Date:
Sep 23, 2006

Citation Formats

Kishida, J. Nuclear power in Japan. IAEA: N. p., 1990. Web.
Kishida, J. Nuclear power in Japan. IAEA.
Kishida, J. 1990. "Nuclear power in Japan." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20767341,
title = {Nuclear power in Japan}
author = {Kishida, J}
abstractNote = {The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1990}
month = {Jul}
}