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Energy and carbon balances of wood cascade chains

Abstract

In this study we analyze the energy and carbon balances of various cascade chains for recovered wood lumber. Post-recovery options include reuse as lumber, reprocessing as particleboard, pulping to form paper products, and burning for energy recovery. We compare energy and carbon balances of chains of cascaded products to the balances of products obtained from virgin wood fiber or from non-wood material. We describe and quantify several mechanisms through which cascading can affect the energy and carbon balances: direct cascade effects due to different properties and logistics of virgin and recovered materials, substitution effects due to the reduced demand for non-wood materials when wood is cascaded, and land use effects due to alternative possible land uses when less timber harvest is needed because of wood cascading. In some analyses we assume the forest is a limiting resource, and in others we include a fixed amount of forest land from which biomass can be harvested for use as material or biofuel. Energy and carbon balances take into account manufacturing processes, recovery and transportation energy, material recovery losses, and forest processes. We find that land use effects have the greatest impact on energy and carbon balances, followed by substitution effects, while direct  More>>
Authors:
Sathre, Roger; Gustavsson, Leif [1] 
  1. Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, SE-831 25 OEstersund (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2006
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Resources, Conservation and Recycling; Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; WOOD; CARBON DIOXIDE; RECYCLING; LAND USE; WOOD WASTES; ENERGY RECOVERY; CARBON; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; MATERIALS RECOVERY; MATERIAL SUBSTITUTION
OSTI ID:
20757970
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0921-3449; RCREEW; TRN: NL06V0228
Availability:
Available from doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2005.12.008
Submitting Site:
ECN
Size:
page(s) 332-355
Announcement Date:
Aug 11, 2006

Citation Formats

Sathre, Roger, and Gustavsson, Leif. Energy and carbon balances of wood cascade chains. Netherlands: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.resconrec.2005.12.008.
Sathre, Roger, & Gustavsson, Leif. Energy and carbon balances of wood cascade chains. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.resconrec.2005.12.008.
Sathre, Roger, and Gustavsson, Leif. 2006. "Energy and carbon balances of wood cascade chains." Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.resconrec.2005.12.008. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/j.resconrec.2005.12.008.
@misc{etde_20757970,
title = {Energy and carbon balances of wood cascade chains}
author = {Sathre, Roger, and Gustavsson, Leif}
abstractNote = {In this study we analyze the energy and carbon balances of various cascade chains for recovered wood lumber. Post-recovery options include reuse as lumber, reprocessing as particleboard, pulping to form paper products, and burning for energy recovery. We compare energy and carbon balances of chains of cascaded products to the balances of products obtained from virgin wood fiber or from non-wood material. We describe and quantify several mechanisms through which cascading can affect the energy and carbon balances: direct cascade effects due to different properties and logistics of virgin and recovered materials, substitution effects due to the reduced demand for non-wood materials when wood is cascaded, and land use effects due to alternative possible land uses when less timber harvest is needed because of wood cascading. In some analyses we assume the forest is a limiting resource, and in others we include a fixed amount of forest land from which biomass can be harvested for use as material or biofuel. Energy and carbon balances take into account manufacturing processes, recovery and transportation energy, material recovery losses, and forest processes. We find that land use effects have the greatest impact on energy and carbon balances, followed by substitution effects, while direct cascade effects are relatively minor. (author)}
doi = {10.1016/j.resconrec.2005.12.008}
journal = {Resources, Conservation and Recycling}
issue = {4}
volume = {47}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {2006}
month = {Jul}
}