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Nuclear technology review 2005 update

Abstract

The year 2004 marked the 50th anniversary of civilian nuclear power generation. While the current outlook for nuclear energy remains mixed, there is clearly a sense of rising expectations. Both the OECD International Energy Agency and the IAEA adjusted their medium-term projections for nuclear power upwards. The IAEA now projects 423 - 592 GW(e) of nuclear power installed worldwide in 2030, compared to 366 GW(e) at the end of 2004. This is driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by new environmental constraints including entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several key countries. National research on advanced reactor designs continues on all reactor categories - water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. Five members of the US-initiated Generation IV International Forum (GIF) signed a framework agreement on international collaboration in research and development on Generation IV nuclear energy systems in February 2005. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 23 members. It completed a series of case studies testing its  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Aug 15, 2005
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-874
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 5 figs, 2 tabs
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACCELERATORS; AGRICULTURE; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; NUCLEAR POWER; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PUBLIC HEALTH; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; THERMONUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; WATER RESOURCES
OSTI ID:
20754989
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Planning and Economic Studies Section, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0600826062789
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form; Also available on-line: http://www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/Pess/assets/ntr2005_E_complete.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
46 pages
Announcement Date:
Aug 11, 2006

Citation Formats

Nuclear technology review 2005 update. IAEA: N. p., 2005. Web.
Nuclear technology review 2005 update. IAEA.
2005. "Nuclear technology review 2005 update." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20754989,
title = {Nuclear technology review 2005 update}
abstractNote = {The year 2004 marked the 50th anniversary of civilian nuclear power generation. While the current outlook for nuclear energy remains mixed, there is clearly a sense of rising expectations. Both the OECD International Energy Agency and the IAEA adjusted their medium-term projections for nuclear power upwards. The IAEA now projects 423 - 592 GW(e) of nuclear power installed worldwide in 2030, compared to 366 GW(e) at the end of 2004. This is driven by nuclear power's performance record, by growing energy needs around the world coupled with rising oil and natural gas prices, by new environmental constraints including entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol, by concerns about energy supply security in a number of countries, and by ambitious expansion plans in several key countries. National research on advanced reactor designs continues on all reactor categories - water cooled, gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and hybrid systems. Five members of the US-initiated Generation IV International Forum (GIF) signed a framework agreement on international collaboration in research and development on Generation IV nuclear energy systems in February 2005. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) grew to 23 members. It completed a series of case studies testing its assessment methodology and the final report on the updated INPRO methodology was published in December. The realization of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, came closer with the announcement on 28 June 2005 by the ITER parties. The aim of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy by constructing a functional fusion power plant. Nuclear technology developments are rapid and cover many fields of application. Not all can be covered in this update review, but certain key areas and trends are covered where these are seen to be of significant interest to IAEA Member States, and which are of relevance to and have a role in helping to meet the Millennium Development Goals and addressing the WEHAB issues (water, energy, health, agriculture and biodiversity) identified at the Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. With agriculture accounting for 70% of global water use, applications of multiple stable isotopes to assess water use efficiency in a range of cropping and water irrigation systems, including, for example, investigations into the influence of water irrigation scheduling on fertiliser use efficiency, are doubly beneficial for the provision of both food and water. Mutation induction breeding for the identification of improved varieties of crops that are water-use efficient and adaptable to growth in harsh environments contributes to increasing the efficiency of use of scant water resources. Water resource management also shows a growing focus on management of transboundary aquifers, using isotopic tools for defining water movement, water age, and determining sources of pollution. In human health, short-lived radionuclides are assisting clinicians to study metabolic processes. One of the fastest growing techniques is positron emission tomography (PET), using ultra short-lived radioisotopes attached to biological markers, which when fused with X-ray computed images provides an even more powerful tool for health monitoring and diagnoses. In the marine environment, new insights into climate change are expected from research using isotopic studies into the El Nino Southern Oscillation phenomenon. Increasing recognition is given to the oceans' ability to absorb carbon dioxide, and thus to their influence on the climate.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2005}
month = {Aug}
}