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Nuclear research reactor 0.5 to 3 MW

Abstract

This nuclear reactor has been designed for radioisotope production, basic and applied research in reactor physics and nuclear engineering, neutron-beam experimentation, irradiation of various materials and training of scientific and technical personnel. It is located in the 'Production Area' of the Nuclear Technology Center. It is equipped with the necessary facilities for large-scale production of radioisotopes to be used in medicine as well as for other scientific and industrial purposes. In addition, it has a Neutronography Facility and the required equipment to perform Neutron-Activation Analysis. It is an open pool-type reactor, moderated and cooled with light water, fuelled with 20% enriched uranium. Its reflector are graphite and water. It has plate-type fuel elements clad in aluminium. The reactor core is located near the bottom of the demineralized water pool. It includes fuel elements, reflector and sample-holding devices for materials to be irradiated. This kind of configuration, which is widely used in research reactors, provides a high degree of safety since it prevents the core from becoming exposed under any circumstance and does not require any cooling system during reactor shutdown. Power output is between 0.5 to 3 MW{sub TH}, with a minimum thermal neutron flux of approx, 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
May 15, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-216
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 9 figs
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; ALUMINIUM; CONTROL SYSTEMS; COOLING SYSTEMS; ENRICHED URANIUM; FUEL ELEMENTS; GRAPHITE; HEAT EXCHANGERS; HEAT EXTRACTION; IRRADIATION; NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; NEUTRON BEAMS; POOL TYPE REACTORS; PUMPS; RADIOISOTOPES; REACTOR CORES; REACTOR SHUTDOWN; RESEARCH REACTORS; THERMAL NEUTRONS; WATER
OSTI ID:
20733611
Research Organizations:
Investigacion Aplicada SE (INVAP), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2794043684
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
22 pages
Announcement Date:
Jun 09, 2006

Citation Formats

Nuclear research reactor 0.5 to 3 MW. IAEA: N. p., 1992. Web.
Nuclear research reactor 0.5 to 3 MW. IAEA.
1992. "Nuclear research reactor 0.5 to 3 MW." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20733611,
title = {Nuclear research reactor 0.5 to 3 MW}
abstractNote = {This nuclear reactor has been designed for radioisotope production, basic and applied research in reactor physics and nuclear engineering, neutron-beam experimentation, irradiation of various materials and training of scientific and technical personnel. It is located in the 'Production Area' of the Nuclear Technology Center. It is equipped with the necessary facilities for large-scale production of radioisotopes to be used in medicine as well as for other scientific and industrial purposes. In addition, it has a Neutronography Facility and the required equipment to perform Neutron-Activation Analysis. It is an open pool-type reactor, moderated and cooled with light water, fuelled with 20% enriched uranium. Its reflector are graphite and water. It has plate-type fuel elements clad in aluminium. The reactor core is located near the bottom of the demineralized water pool. It includes fuel elements, reflector and sample-holding devices for materials to be irradiated. This kind of configuration, which is widely used in research reactors, provides a high degree of safety since it prevents the core from becoming exposed under any circumstance and does not require any cooling system during reactor shutdown. Power output is between 0.5 to 3 MW{sub TH}, with a minimum thermal neutron flux of approx, 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec, at irradiation zone almost with no modifications. Heat extraction is achieved by means of a cooling circuit which comprises two circulation pumps and a plate-type heat exchanger. Final heat dissipation to the atmosphere is performed through another cooling circuit which includes two circulation pumps and a cooling tower. Reactor control is accomplished with five neutron-absorbing rods positioned by means of especially designed elements and governed by the reactor's instrumentation and control system. Should an abnormal situation arise, gravity causes the rods to fall automatically, thus extinguishing the nuclear reaction. The reactor building has a ventilation system which, apart from providing a comfortable working environment for reactor personnel, is capable of confining any accidental radioactive leakage. To this effect, the building is maintained at a slight depression. Absolute and activated-charcoal filters are used to keep the air clean.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1992}
month = {May}
}