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The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity

Abstract

The ecological impact on local wildlife of biomass plantations of three different species of grasses has been monitored in the years 2002 to 2004 inclusive at farms in Herefordshire UK. Two of the grasses were not native to Britain. Wildlife monitored included ground flora, beetles, insects, birds, small mammals, butterflies, bees and hoverflies. The results provide a baseline of biodiversity data from biomass farms in England, although due to poor crop growth, the data from the switch-grass plantation was incomplete. The surveys were carried out by Cardiff University supported financially by the DTI.
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2005
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
URN-05-1307; B-CR-00782-00-00
Reference Number:
RN06047204; TVI: 0512
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS PLANTATIONS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; WILD ANIMALS; MONITORING; UNITED KINGDOM; GRAMINEAE; SPECIES DIVERSITY
Sponsoring Organizations:
Department of Trade and Industry, London (United Kingdom)
OSTI ID:
20714614
Research Organizations:
Cardiff University (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: GB0600008
Availability:
Commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20714614
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
106 pages
Announcement Date:
May 05, 2006

Citation Formats

Semere, T, and Slater, F. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity. United Kingdom: N. p., 2005. Web.
Semere, T, & Slater, F. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity. United Kingdom.
Semere, T, and Slater, F. 2005. "The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_20714614,
title = {The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity}
author = {Semere, T, and Slater, F}
abstractNote = {The ecological impact on local wildlife of biomass plantations of three different species of grasses has been monitored in the years 2002 to 2004 inclusive at farms in Herefordshire UK. Two of the grasses were not native to Britain. Wildlife monitored included ground flora, beetles, insects, birds, small mammals, butterflies, bees and hoverflies. The results provide a baseline of biodiversity data from biomass farms in England, although due to poor crop growth, the data from the switch-grass plantation was incomplete. The surveys were carried out by Cardiff University supported financially by the DTI.}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2005}
month = {Jul}
}