You need JavaScript to view this

Ecological transfer mechanisms - Terrestrial

Abstract

Radionuclides produced by nuclear excavation detonations and released to the environment may enter a variety of biogeochemical cycles and follow essentially the same transfer pathways as their stable-element counterparts. Estimation of potential internal radiation doses to individuals and/or populations living in or near fallout-contaminated areas requires analysis of the food-chain and other ecological pathways by which radionuclides released to the environment may be returned to man. A generalized materials transfer diagram, applicable to the forest, agricultural, freshwater and marine ecosystems providing food and water to the indigenous population of Panama and Colombia in regions that could be affected by nuclear excavation of a sea-level canal between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, is presented. Transfer mechanisms effecting the movement of stable elements and radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems are discussed, and methods used to simulate these processes by means of mathematical models are described to show how intake values are calculated for different radionuclides in the major ecological pathways leading to man. These data provide a basis for estimating potential internal radiation doses for comparison with the radiation protection criteria established by recognized authorities; and this, in turn, provides a basis for recommending measures to insure the radiological safety of the nuclear  More>>
Authors:
Martin, W E; Raines, Gilbert E; Bloom, S G; Levin, A A [1] 
  1. Battelle Memorial Institute, CoIumbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-193; PB-187349; SWRHL-82
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 7-11 Apr 1969; Other Information: 29 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab; Related Information: In: Proceedings for the symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, 719 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; ENVIRONMENT; FALLOUT; FOOD CHAINS; FORESTS; INTAKE; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; NUCLEAR EXCAVATION; PACIFIC OCEAN; PANAMA; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIOISOTOPES; SEA LEVEL; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS
Sponsoring Organizations:
Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Bureau of Radiological Health (United States)
OSTI ID:
20699896
Research Organizations:
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Consumer Protection and Environmental Health Service, Environmental Control Administration (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Contract AT(26-1)-171; TRN: XA04N2197015898
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 401-435
Announcement Date:
Apr 07, 2006

Citation Formats

Martin, W E, Raines, Gilbert E, Bloom, S G, and Levin, A A. Ecological transfer mechanisms - Terrestrial. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Martin, W E, Raines, Gilbert E, Bloom, S G, & Levin, A A. Ecological transfer mechanisms - Terrestrial. IAEA.
Martin, W E, Raines, Gilbert E, Bloom, S G, and Levin, A A. 1969. "Ecological transfer mechanisms - Terrestrial." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20699896,
title = {Ecological transfer mechanisms - Terrestrial}
author = {Martin, W E, Raines, Gilbert E, Bloom, S G, and Levin, A A}
abstractNote = {Radionuclides produced by nuclear excavation detonations and released to the environment may enter a variety of biogeochemical cycles and follow essentially the same transfer pathways as their stable-element counterparts. Estimation of potential internal radiation doses to individuals and/or populations living in or near fallout-contaminated areas requires analysis of the food-chain and other ecological pathways by which radionuclides released to the environment may be returned to man. A generalized materials transfer diagram, applicable to the forest, agricultural, freshwater and marine ecosystems providing food and water to the indigenous population of Panama and Colombia in regions that could be affected by nuclear excavation of a sea-level canal between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, is presented. Transfer mechanisms effecting the movement of stable elements and radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems are discussed, and methods used to simulate these processes by means of mathematical models are described to show how intake values are calculated for different radionuclides in the major ecological pathways leading to man. These data provide a basis for estimating potential internal radiation doses for comparison with the radiation protection criteria established by recognized authorities; and this, in turn, provides a basis for recommending measures to insure the radiological safety of the nuclear operation plan. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Jul}
}