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Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment

Abstract

Certain proposed uses of nuclear explosives for peaceful purposes will introduce radioactive debris into the natural hydrologic environment. Consideration must therefore be given in each situation to the extent and significance to man of resulting radioactively contaminated water. For contained underground detonations, space-time - concentration predictions of radioactive materials in ground water are dependent on several factors: radionuclide production and initial distribution, radioactive decay, sorption on geologic materials, and dispersion during hydrologic transport. For uncontained (cratering) detonations, other aspects of the hydrologic cycle, particularly rainfall, and watershed characteristics must be considered. Programs sponsored principally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission have investigated these factors. Examination of their net effects on radioactivity concentration in water shows that areas if any, underlain by water exceeding permissible concentrations tend first to increase in size, then decrease, and finally disappear. Hydrologic processes at the surface remove or redistribute radioactive debris deposited on a watershed to other locations. Where sufficient information is available, predictions of location and concentration of radionuclides in natural waters can be made. Any potentially hazardous conditions arising from a particular detonation can then be evaluated. (author)
Authors:
Werner, L B [1] 
  1. Isotopes, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-193; PB-187349; SWRHL-82
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 7-11 Apr 1969; Other Information: 4 refs, 10 figs; Related Information: In: Proceedings for the symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, 719 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; EXPLOSIONS; FORECASTING; GROUND WATER; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVITY; SORPTION; SPACE-TIME; UNDERGROUND; WATERSHEDS
Sponsoring Organizations:
Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Bureau of Radiological Health (United States)
OSTI ID:
20699892
Research Organizations:
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Consumer Protection and Environmental Health Service, Environmental Control Administration (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2193015894
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 280-308
Announcement Date:
Apr 07, 2006

Citation Formats

Werner, L B. Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Werner, L B. Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment. IAEA.
Werner, L B. 1969. "Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20699892,
title = {Radioactivity in the hydrologic environment}
author = {Werner, L B}
abstractNote = {Certain proposed uses of nuclear explosives for peaceful purposes will introduce radioactive debris into the natural hydrologic environment. Consideration must therefore be given in each situation to the extent and significance to man of resulting radioactively contaminated water. For contained underground detonations, space-time - concentration predictions of radioactive materials in ground water are dependent on several factors: radionuclide production and initial distribution, radioactive decay, sorption on geologic materials, and dispersion during hydrologic transport. For uncontained (cratering) detonations, other aspects of the hydrologic cycle, particularly rainfall, and watershed characteristics must be considered. Programs sponsored principally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission have investigated these factors. Examination of their net effects on radioactivity concentration in water shows that areas if any, underlain by water exceeding permissible concentrations tend first to increase in size, then decrease, and finally disappear. Hydrologic processes at the surface remove or redistribute radioactive debris deposited on a watershed to other locations. Where sufficient information is available, predictions of location and concentration of radionuclides in natural waters can be made. Any potentially hazardous conditions arising from a particular detonation can then be evaluated. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Jul}
}