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Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application

Abstract

The constraints on nuclide production are usually very similar in any underground engineering application of nuclear explosives. However, in some applications the end product could be contaminated unless the proper nuclear device is used. This fact can be illustrated from two underground engineering experiments-Gasbuggy and Sloop. In the Gasbuggy experiment, appreciable tritium has been shown to be present in the gas currently being produced. However, in future gas stimulation applications (as distinct from experiments), a minimum production of tritium by the explosive is desirable since product contamination by this nuclide may place severe limitations on the use of the tritiated gas. In Sloop, where production of copper is the goal of the experiment, product contamination would not be caused by tritium but could result from other nuclides: Thus, gas stimulation could require the use of fission explosives while the lower cost per kiloton of thermonuclear explosives could make them attractive for ore-crushing applications. Because of this consideration, radionuclide production calculations must be made for both fission and for thermonuclear explosives in the underground environment. Such activation calculations materials of construction are performed in a manner similar to that described in another paper, but radionuclide production in the environment must be  More>>
Authors:
Tewes, H A [1] 
  1. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-193; PB-187349; SWRHL-82
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 7-11 Apr 1969; Other Information: 27 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab; Related Information: In: Proceedings for the symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, 719 pages.
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; AMBIENT TEMPERATURE; CONTAMINATION; CRUSHING; FISSION NEUTRONS; MEV RANGE 10-100; MINING ENGINEERING; NEUTRON SOURCES; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; ROCKS; TRITIUM; UNDERGROUND
Sponsoring Organizations:
Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Bureau of Radiological Health (United States)
OSTI ID:
20699889
Research Organizations:
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Consumer Protection and Environmental Health Service, Environmental Control Administration (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2190015891
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 207-222
Announcement Date:
Apr 07, 2006

Citation Formats

Tewes, H A. Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Tewes, H A. Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application. IAEA.
Tewes, H A. 1969. "Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20699889,
title = {Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application}
author = {Tewes, H A}
abstractNote = {The constraints on nuclide production are usually very similar in any underground engineering application of nuclear explosives. However, in some applications the end product could be contaminated unless the proper nuclear device is used. This fact can be illustrated from two underground engineering experiments-Gasbuggy and Sloop. In the Gasbuggy experiment, appreciable tritium has been shown to be present in the gas currently being produced. However, in future gas stimulation applications (as distinct from experiments), a minimum production of tritium by the explosive is desirable since product contamination by this nuclide may place severe limitations on the use of the tritiated gas. In Sloop, where production of copper is the goal of the experiment, product contamination would not be caused by tritium but could result from other nuclides: Thus, gas stimulation could require the use of fission explosives while the lower cost per kiloton of thermonuclear explosives could make them attractive for ore-crushing applications. Because of this consideration, radionuclide production calculations must be made for both fission and for thermonuclear explosives in the underground environment. Such activation calculations materials of construction are performed in a manner similar to that described in another paper, but radionuclide production in the environment must be computed using both fission neutron and 14-MeV neutron sources in order to treat the 'source term' problem realistically. In making such computations, parameter studies including the effects of environmental temperature, neutron shielding, and rock types have been carried out. Results indicate the importance of carefully evaluating the radionuclide production for each individual underground engineering application. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Jul}
}