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Technical problems and future underground engineering experiments

Abstract

The technical problems to be solved in future underground engineering experiments are of two kinds. One concerns adequate description of the variation of nuclear explosion effects with physical nd chemical properties of the explosion site. The other concerns engineering of the explosive detonation system to provide adequate safety and security, concurrently with minimum total costs per explosion. The semiempirical equations for explosion effects can be trusted only in the range of explosive energy, depth of burst, and rock type for which there is prior experience. Effects calculations based on the principles of continuum mechanics and measurable geophysical properties appear to work in the few test cases, such as Gasbuggy, to which they have been applied. These calculational methods must be tested in a variety of situations. The relevance of dynamic and static measurements on Dragon Trail, Bronco, Rulison, Stoop, Ketch, and Pinedale to proving the methods are discussed in this paper. The traditional methods of assembling and fielding nuclear explosives have evolved from practice at the Nevada Test Site. These provide great flexibility and assure maximum recovery of all data from each test, thus minimizing the time required to achieve desired results. Timing and firing, radiation monitoring, explosives assembly and  More>>
Authors:
Higgins, G H [1] 
  1. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-193; PB-187349; SWRHL-82
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 7-11 Apr 1969; Other Information: 21 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs; Related Information: In: Proceedings for the symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, 719 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; FLEXIBILITY; NEVADA TEST SITE; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; PERFORMANCE; RADIATION MONITORING; ROCKS; SECURITY; UNDERGROUND; WEATHER
Sponsoring Organizations:
Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Bureau of Radiological Health (United States)
OSTI ID:
20699886
Research Organizations:
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Consumer Protection and Environmental Health Service, Environmental Control Administration (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2187015888
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 160-175
Announcement Date:
Apr 07, 2006

Citation Formats

Higgins, G H. Technical problems and future underground engineering experiments. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Higgins, G H. Technical problems and future underground engineering experiments. IAEA.
Higgins, G H. 1969. "Technical problems and future underground engineering experiments." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20699886,
title = {Technical problems and future underground engineering experiments}
author = {Higgins, G H}
abstractNote = {The technical problems to be solved in future underground engineering experiments are of two kinds. One concerns adequate description of the variation of nuclear explosion effects with physical nd chemical properties of the explosion site. The other concerns engineering of the explosive detonation system to provide adequate safety and security, concurrently with minimum total costs per explosion. The semiempirical equations for explosion effects can be trusted only in the range of explosive energy, depth of burst, and rock type for which there is prior experience. Effects calculations based on the principles of continuum mechanics and measurable geophysical properties appear to work in the few test cases, such as Gasbuggy, to which they have been applied. These calculational methods must be tested in a variety of situations. The relevance of dynamic and static measurements on Dragon Trail, Bronco, Rulison, Stoop, Ketch, and Pinedale to proving the methods are discussed in this paper. The traditional methods of assembling and fielding nuclear explosives have evolved from practice at the Nevada Test Site. These provide great flexibility and assure maximum recovery of all data from each test, thus minimizing the time required to achieve desired results. Timing and firing, radiation monitoring, explosives assembly and emplacement, explosive performance, weather monitoring, and dynamic measurements of earth and building motion have all been handled traditionally as independent functions. To achieve lower costs in underground engineering experiments and projects, one prototype system combining all electronic, measurement, and communication functions is being built. Much further work will be required to complete this effort, including, especially, an examination of safety criteria and means for assuring operational and public safety at reduced costs. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Jul}
}