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Summary of results of underground engineering experience

Abstract

Results pertinent to the use of nuclear explosives in underground engineering applications have been accumulating for the past 10 years from the Plowshare and Weapons tests of the AEC. Thus, predictive and measurement techniques of shock effects and chimney formation were developed in the course of analyzing explosions in granite, salt, and dolomite. The ability to predict effects related specifically to safety has resulted from many measurements on detonations at the Nevada Test Site, where also many of the techniques for handling, emplacing, and firing the explosive have been developed. This gestation period culminated in the execution of Project Gasbuggy, jointly sponsored by industry and government, and the first nuclear explosion in a gasbearing formation. The Gasbuggy explosive had a nominal yield of 25 kt and was detonated 4240 ft below the surface in the San Juan Basin in northwestern New Mexico on December 10, 1967. The shot point was 40 ft below the lower boundary of a 285-ft-thick gas-bearing sandstone formation of very low permeability. No radioactive venting occurred, and no damage to surrounding gas wells or structures resulted. Post-shot geophysical exploration and gas production tests have revealed that the nuclear explosion created a subsurface chimney approximately 160 ft  More>>
Authors:
Holzer, F [1] 
  1. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-193; PB-187349; SWRHL-82
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 7-11 Apr 1969; Other Information: 14 refs, 16 figs; Related Information: In: Proceedings for the symposium on public health aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear explosives, 719 pages.
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; CHIMNEYS; DOLOMITE; FRACTURES; GAS BEARINGS; GRANITES; KRYPTON 85; NATURAL GAS WELLS; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; NEVADA TEST SITE; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; PERMEABILITY; SANDSTONES; SMALL ANGLE SCATTERING; TRITIUM
Sponsoring Organizations:
Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Bureau of Radiological Health (United States)
OSTI ID:
20699885
Research Organizations:
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Consumer Protection and Environmental Health Service, Environmental Control Administration (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2186015887
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 133-159
Announcement Date:
Apr 10, 2006

Citation Formats

Holzer, F. Summary of results of underground engineering experience. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Holzer, F. Summary of results of underground engineering experience. IAEA.
Holzer, F. 1969. "Summary of results of underground engineering experience." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20699885,
title = {Summary of results of underground engineering experience}
author = {Holzer, F}
abstractNote = {Results pertinent to the use of nuclear explosives in underground engineering applications have been accumulating for the past 10 years from the Plowshare and Weapons tests of the AEC. Thus, predictive and measurement techniques of shock effects and chimney formation were developed in the course of analyzing explosions in granite, salt, and dolomite. The ability to predict effects related specifically to safety has resulted from many measurements on detonations at the Nevada Test Site, where also many of the techniques for handling, emplacing, and firing the explosive have been developed. This gestation period culminated in the execution of Project Gasbuggy, jointly sponsored by industry and government, and the first nuclear explosion in a gasbearing formation. The Gasbuggy explosive had a nominal yield of 25 kt and was detonated 4240 ft below the surface in the San Juan Basin in northwestern New Mexico on December 10, 1967. The shot point was 40 ft below the lower boundary of a 285-ft-thick gas-bearing sandstone formation of very low permeability. No radioactive venting occurred, and no damage to surrounding gas wells or structures resulted. Post-shot geophysical exploration and gas production tests have revealed that the nuclear explosion created a subsurface chimney approximately 160 ft in diameter and 335 ft high. Fractures appear to extend to about 400 ft symmetrically from the detonation point, with shifts or offsets along geological weaknesses extending out to perhaps 750 ft. Presently, radioactive constituents in the gas consist of tritium and krypton-85, with concentrations of approximately 10 {mu}Ci/ft{sup 3} and 1.5 {mu}Ci/ft{sup 3} respectively. These concentrations are decreasing a gas withdrawn from the chimney is replaced by formation gas. Tests to evaluate the increase in productivity and ultimate recovery are currently in progress. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Jul}
}