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Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor

Abstract

After the accident to No. 1 pile at Windscale on October 10, 1957 (Atomic Energy Office, 1957), the Atomic Energy Authority asked the Medical Research Council for advice on the maximum intake of certain radioactive isotopes that should be regarded as permissible, under emergency conditions, for members of the general population living in, or deriving food from, an area contaminated owing to an accident to a reactor. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, together with its Subcommittees on Internal and External Radiations, has considered this problem, and concludes that the intake of radioactive materials by ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident. Intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances. In the following report, therefore, the Committee proposes maximum permissible levels of dietary contamination for the relevant isotopes in the emergency conditions envisaged. In proposing these levels, the Protection Committee has used the fullest information available on the radiation doses that would be delivered to different body tissues and at different ages by the isotopes concerned, and on the ways in which these materials would enter the body.
Authors:
Pochin, E E; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W M [1] 
  1. Medical Research Council, Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, London (United Kingdom); and others
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1960
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-258
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 13 refs; Presented to Parliament by the Lord President of the Council and Minister for Science by Command of Her Majesty, December 1960; Related Information: In: The hazards to man of nuclear and allied radiations. A second report to the Medical Research Council, 163 pages.
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DOSE LIMITS; DRINKING WATER; FOOD; INGESTION; MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE BODY BURDEN; MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE INTAKE; RADIATION PROTECTION; REACTOR ACCIDENTS
OSTI ID:
20685332
Research Organizations:
Medical Research Council, Westminster, London (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2884004436
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 140-145
Announcement Date:
Jan 23, 2006

Citation Formats

Pochin, E E, Rock Carling, Ernest, and Court Brown, W M. Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor. IAEA: N. p., 1960. Web.
Pochin, E E, Rock Carling, Ernest, & Court Brown, W M. Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor. IAEA.
Pochin, E E, Rock Carling, Ernest, and Court Brown, W M. 1960. "Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20685332,
title = {Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor}
author = {Pochin, E E, Rock Carling, Ernest, and Court Brown, W M}
abstractNote = {After the accident to No. 1 pile at Windscale on October 10, 1957 (Atomic Energy Office, 1957), the Atomic Energy Authority asked the Medical Research Council for advice on the maximum intake of certain radioactive isotopes that should be regarded as permissible, under emergency conditions, for members of the general population living in, or deriving food from, an area contaminated owing to an accident to a reactor. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, together with its Subcommittees on Internal and External Radiations, has considered this problem, and concludes that the intake of radioactive materials by ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident. Intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances. In the following report, therefore, the Committee proposes maximum permissible levels of dietary contamination for the relevant isotopes in the emergency conditions envisaged. In proposing these levels, the Protection Committee has used the fullest information available on the radiation doses that would be delivered to different body tissues and at different ages by the isotopes concerned, and on the ways in which these materials would enter the body.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1960}
month = {Dec}
}