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Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas

Abstract

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States. Furthermore, the cost for control of radon levels in LPG would be over $50 million for reduction of one health effect, therefore it is concluded that a requirement for such controls would not be cost effective on a national basis.  More>>
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1977
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
EPA-520/1-75-002; INIS-XA-N-254
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 49 refs, 10 figs, 20 tabs
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; 02 PETROLEUM; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CARCINOMAS; DAUGHTER PRODUCTS; LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GASES; LUNGS; PUBLIC HEALTH; RADON 222; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
OSTI ID:
20685114
Research Organizations:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation Programs, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N2871004210
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
68 pages
Announcement Date:
Jan 21, 2006

Citation Formats

Gesell, Thomas F, Johnson, Jr, Raymond H, and Bernhardt, David E. Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas. IAEA: N. p., 1977. Web.
Gesell, Thomas F, Johnson, Jr, Raymond H, & Bernhardt, David E. Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas. IAEA.
Gesell, Thomas F, Johnson, Jr, Raymond H, and Bernhardt, David E. 1977. "Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20685114,
title = {Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas}
author = {Gesell, Thomas F, Johnson, Jr, Raymond H, and Bernhardt, David E}
abstractNote = {Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States. Furthermore, the cost for control of radon levels in LPG would be over $50 million for reduction of one health effect, therefore it is concluded that a requirement for such controls would not be cost effective on a national basis. This study did indicate that individual dose equivalents could possibly exceed 500 mrem/year. However, existing data are not sufficient to determine the significance of such potentially high individual doses. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1977}
month = {Feb}
}